Sushi and Beyond: What the Japanese Know About Cooking

Michael Booth

Sushi and Beyond: What the Japanese Know About Cooking

Inspired by Shizuo Tsuji's classic book, "Japanese Cooking, A Simple Art", food and travel writer Michael Booth sets off to take the culinary pulse of contemporary Japan, learning fascinating tips and recipes that few westerners have been privy to before. Accompanied by with two fussy eaters under the age of six, he and his wife travel the length of the country, from bear-infested, beer-loving Hokkaido to snake-infested, seaweed-loving Okinawa. Along the way, they dine with - and score a surprising victory over - sumos; meet the indigenous Ainu; drink coffee at the dog cafe; pamper the world's most expensive cows with massage and beer; discover the secret of the Okinawan people's remarkable longevity; share a seaside lunch with free-diving, female abalone hunters; and, meet the greatest chefs working in Japan today. Less happily, they trash a Zen garden, witness a mass fugu slaughter, are traumatised by an encounter with giant crabs, and attempt a calamitous cooking demonstration for the lunching ladies of Kyoto. 3.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Sushi and Beyond: What the Japanese Know About Cooking

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Paperback
Pages 336
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication May 2009
ISBN 978-0224081887
Publisher Jonathan Cape
 

Inspired by Shizuo Tsuji's classic book, "Japanese Cooking, A Simple Art", food and travel writer Michael Booth sets off to take the culinary pulse of contemporary Japan, learning fascinating tips and recipes that few westerners have been privy to before. Accompanied by with two fussy eaters under the age of six, he and his wife travel the length of the country, from bear-infested, beer-loving Hokkaido to snake-infested, seaweed-loving Okinawa. Along the way, they dine with - and score a surprising victory over - sumos; meet the indigenous Ainu; drink coffee at the dog cafe; pamper the world's most expensive cows with massage and beer; discover the secret of the Okinawan people's remarkable longevity; share a seaside lunch with free-diving, female abalone hunters; and, meet the greatest chefs working in Japan today. Less happily, they trash a Zen garden, witness a mass fugu slaughter, are traumatised by an encounter with giant crabs, and attempt a calamitous cooking demonstration for the lunching ladies of Kyoto.

Reviews

The Independent

Christopher Hirst

Much of the book is interesting and well-written, but Booth should have had more faith in his subject matter. He should have resisted the temptation to include cultural bafflements familiar from Lost In Translation.

26/06/2009

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