Shooting the Cook

David Pritchard

Shooting the Cook

As the producer behind the Keith Floyd and Rick Stein BBC cookery programmes, David Pritchard tells the tale of the ascent of the chef celebre... Twenty five years ago, no one could have foreseen the incredible popularity commanded by food programmes on television today. Now we have a whole army of chefs representing virtually every single personality trait from sexy to aggressive, to young and experimental. But back then, charismatic, erratic, always happy to have a slurp of wine or two, and not afraid to say exactly what he thought on air, Floyd was a revelation. This was a chef that television had not seen the like of before. Freed from the constraints of studio filming, Floyd brought us the idea of cooking on location, but most importantly, he simply invited viewers to have fun and enjoy being in the kitchen. "Shooting the Cook" divulges the stories of what went on behind the scenes to the groundbreaking television that inspired the event of modern television chefs as we understand them today. 3.8 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Shooting the Cook

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink, Music, Stage & Screen
Format Hardback
Pages 400
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication April 2009
ISBN 978-0007278305
Publisher Fourth Estate
 

As the producer behind the Keith Floyd and Rick Stein BBC cookery programmes, David Pritchard tells the tale of the ascent of the chef celebre... Twenty five years ago, no one could have foreseen the incredible popularity commanded by food programmes on television today. Now we have a whole army of chefs representing virtually every single personality trait from sexy to aggressive, to young and experimental. But back then, charismatic, erratic, always happy to have a slurp of wine or two, and not afraid to say exactly what he thought on air, Floyd was a revelation. This was a chef that television had not seen the like of before. Freed from the constraints of studio filming, Floyd brought us the idea of cooking on location, but most importantly, he simply invited viewers to have fun and enjoy being in the kitchen. "Shooting the Cook" divulges the stories of what went on behind the scenes to the groundbreaking television that inspired the event of modern television chefs as we understand them today.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Kate Colquhoun

Pritchard is the trencherman you want to get chatting to in the fugged-up atmosphere of a pub serving great food – full of wry anecdotes and a memory stuffed with the sharp details of life… But however thrilling his inside track on the strained, “frayed elastic band” relationship with Floyd – however alluring and evocative the descriptions of porcini omelettes and clam chowders – it is as a writer with a film-maker’s eye that Pritchard really shines.

26/06/2009

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The Observer

William Skidelsky

The irony is that Pritchard, though a late starter in gastronomic terms, and defiantly patriotic in his tastes, actually has a genuine love for food and the best passages in Shooting the Cook are when he communicates this... In fact, if the book has a problem, it is that it contains too much about Floyd and Stein and not enough about Pritchard... A good and interesting book might have been an even better one had he allowed himself to hog the limelight a little more.

10/05/2009

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The Daily Mail

Sam Leith

This is pretty thin stuff for a memoir: a catalogue of memorable meals and amiable but inconsequential anecdotes about long-ago logistical snarl-ups. The punchlines tend to be words to the effect: 'Fortunately, it turned out OK - but that was a close one!' It's harmless enough stuff, but it feels a little underpowered... You long for more personal material, more passion, more feeling.

14/05/2009

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