Sectioned: A Life Interrupted

John O'Donoghue

Sectioned: A Life Interrupted

"'When my father died, I stayed off school to look after my mother. I was fourteen and was as incapable of looking after her as she was at looking after me. She took to wandering the roads and was soon taken into hospital. The social worker asked me if I wanted to be fostered and I said yes. Two years later, in 1975, I was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. That was the beginning of it all: medication, ECT, the locked ward. I've been sectioned five times, in and out of asylums, homeless hostels, squats and on the streets. I nearly hit the end of the road. But then, almost overnight, my life turned round. Sectioned is my story." John O'Donoghue 4.5 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Sectioned: A Life Interrupted

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Psychology & Psychiatry, Health & Medical
Format Hardback
Pages 304
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication February 2009
ISBN 978-1848540125
Publisher John Murray
 

"'When my father died, I stayed off school to look after my mother. I was fourteen and was as incapable of looking after her as she was at looking after me. She took to wandering the roads and was soon taken into hospital. The social worker asked me if I wanted to be fostered and I said yes. Two years later, in 1975, I was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. That was the beginning of it all: medication, ECT, the locked ward. I've been sectioned five times, in and out of asylums, homeless hostels, squats and on the streets. I nearly hit the end of the road. But then, almost overnight, my life turned round. Sectioned is my story." John O'Donoghue

Reviews

The Guardian

Blake Morrison

The humdrum reality of mental illness has rarely been so well conveyed. It's less a story of locked wards than of hostels, soup kitchens, sheltered housing, drug addicts, well-meaning charity workers and relentless poverty. O'Donoghue is honest about his own failings: misfortune is compounded by his capacity to fuck up. What saves him, in part, is poetry...

07/02/2009

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The Sunday Times

Ian Critchley

...a beautifully drawn account... He describes some very dark moments ... Yet there is not an ounce of self-pity for his ‘lost' years, and the book is punctuated with moments of vibrant humour and a great sense of irony, not least on his wedding day, when he realised that the video of the ceremony had been accidentally shot over a copy of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

22/02/2009

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