Matthew: A Memoir

Anne Crosby

Matthew: A Memoir

From the moment she first held her newborn son in her arms, Anne Crosby knew something was wrong with him. Her instincts were correct: Matthew had Down's syndrome. Struggling with feelings of shock and grief, she determined that she would do whatever she could to help him lead as full a life as possible. This is the moving, insightful, and utterly candid account of the life Matthew made with the help of his mother and other caring people. Crosby also explores Matthew's inner life, revealing his playful mimicry and unexpected humour, his bursts of affection and occasional fits of temper and his gallantry toward his first love. Anne Crosby's portrait of her son gives us an abiding image of Matthew that deepens our understanding of what it means to be human. 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Matthew: A Memoir

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Family & Lifestyle, Health & Medical
Format Paperback
Pages 354
RRP £9.99
Date of Publication January 2009
ISBN 978-1906598228
Publisher Haus
 

From the moment she first held her newborn son in her arms, Anne Crosby knew something was wrong with him. Her instincts were correct: Matthew had Down's syndrome. Struggling with feelings of shock and grief, she determined that she would do whatever she could to help him lead as full a life as possible. This is the moving, insightful, and utterly candid account of the life Matthew made with the help of his mother and other caring people. Crosby also explores Matthew's inner life, revealing his playful mimicry and unexpected humour, his bursts of affection and occasional fits of temper and his gallantry toward his first love. Anne Crosby's portrait of her son gives us an abiding image of Matthew that deepens our understanding of what it means to be human.

First published in October 2006.

Reviews

The Spectator

Elisa Segrave

...the book is much more than a guide for parents, or carers, of [children with Down's Syndrome]. It stands on its own as a work of literature and should win the PEN/Ackerley prize for memoir and autobiography... Crosby is a painter, and has a memory for visual detail. However, she also has the ability to reproduce dialogue and, in particular, her son’s idiosyncratic remarks... [A] brave and magnificent book.

18/02/2009

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