Six Months in Sudan: A Young Doctor in a War-torn Village

James Maskalyk

Six Months in Sudan: A Young Doctor in a War-torn Village

James Maskalyk set out for the contested border town of Abyei, Sudan in 2007 as Medecins Sans Frontieres' newest medical doctor in the field. Equipped with his experience as an emergency physician in a Western hospital and his desire to understand the hardest parts of the world, Maskalyk's days were spent treating malnourished children, fending off a measles epidemic and staying out of the soldiers' way. Worn raw in the struggle to meet overwhelming needs with inadequate resources, he returned home six months later more affected by the experience, the people and the place than he had anticipated. Six Months in Sudan began as a blog that he wrote from his hut in Sudan in an attempt to bring his family and friends closer to his hot, hot days. It is a story about humans: the people of Abyei who suffer its hardship because it is their home, and the doctors, nurses and countless volunteers who leave their homes with the tools to make another's easier to endure. 4.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Six Months in Sudan: A Young Doctor in a War-torn Village

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Health & Medical, Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Hardback
Pages 352
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication May 2009
ISBN 978-1847672742
Publisher Canongate
 

James Maskalyk set out for the contested border town of Abyei, Sudan in 2007 as Medecins Sans Frontieres' newest medical doctor in the field. Equipped with his experience as an emergency physician in a Western hospital and his desire to understand the hardest parts of the world, Maskalyk's days were spent treating malnourished children, fending off a measles epidemic and staying out of the soldiers' way. Worn raw in the struggle to meet overwhelming needs with inadequate resources, he returned home six months later more affected by the experience, the people and the place than he had anticipated. Six Months in Sudan began as a blog that he wrote from his hut in Sudan in an attempt to bring his family and friends closer to his hot, hot days. It is a story about humans: the people of Abyei who suffer its hardship because it is their home, and the doctors, nurses and countless volunteers who leave their homes with the tools to make another's easier to endure.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Sally Raikes

[A] moving account... Honest and fluently written, Maskalyk’s book traces his rapport with his colleagues, his growing affection for his adopted town of Abyei and the readjustment he faces on returning home to Canada. It is an absorbing insight into international medicine.

15/06/2009

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Ned Denny

There are two distinct lessons to be drawn from this brave and intelligent memoir. Most obviously, you finish it with immense respect for those who battle - the word is scarcely inappropriate - for organisations such as MSF. Their work is selfless, courageous and truly invaluable. Second, you catch something of Maskalyk's growing sense of life's utter preciousness, a sense that we in the First World endlessly lose sight of.

19/06/2009

Read Full Review


The Scotsman

Mary Crockett

One of the books Maskalyk takes with him to Abyei is James Joyce's Ulysses. He doesn't say so, but you know it's because he's looking for inspiration for his writing style. Then the heat melts the binding, and he chucks it away. This visceral account is all the better for it. That he has already told you how it will end – with renewed fighting and the evacuation of the MSF workers – gives it added poignancy.

23/05/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore