My Bonnie: How Dementia Stole the Love of My Life

John Suchet

My Bonnie: How Dementia Stole the Love of My Life

Earlier this year John Suchet revealed that his 67-year-old wife Bonnie, the love of his life, is suffering from Dementia. During the past three years he has gone from lover to carer. And he has found that exceptionally tough. This is a story of pain and despair, and anger and guilt. But above all that it is a story of love; a story of devotion and dedication, and the pleasure that those little moments of recognition, those glimmers of joy, can give – even in the hardest times. 4.1 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
My Bonnie: How Dementia Stole the Love of My Life

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Health & Medical, Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £18.99
Date of Publication May 2010
ISBN 978-0007328420
Publisher HarperCollins
 

Earlier this year John Suchet revealed that his 67-year-old wife Bonnie, the love of his life, is suffering from Dementia. During the past three years he has gone from lover to carer. And he has found that exceptionally tough. This is a story of pain and despair, and anger and guilt. But above all that it is a story of love; a story of devotion and dedication, and the pleasure that those little moments of recognition, those glimmers of joy, can give – even in the hardest times.

Read an extract from the book at MailOnline

Reviews

The Daily Mail

John Preston

One of the many virtues of My Bonnie is its frankness. Suchet does not spare himself, admitting that, on occasions, he has been cruel and violent… a courageous and valuable book

04/06/2010

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The Observer

Kate Kellaway

What is likable about the memoir is Suchet's lack of a stiff upper lip. He writes about love in the tone of a schoolboy, trying to make sense of an overwhelming crush. You might say he protests too much in his worship of his "east coast blonde" were it not obvious that his pride in his wife and admiration of her beauty – not to mention his appreciation of her sherry trifle – are so genuine.

12/06/2010

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The Spectator

Ian Dunlop

It is not great literature, but the writing is honest and the emotions he has been put through over the last four or five years are, I can testify, ones which many carers will recognise in themselves.

17/07/2010

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The Sunday Times

Andrea Gillies

This isn’t a beautifully written book; the prose can be clunky and it is a blow-by-blow account. But it is heartfelt, vivid and true, and that’s what it set out to be.

20/06/2010

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