An Orchard Invisible: A Natural History of Seeds

Jonathan Silvertown

An Orchard Invisible: A Natural History of Seeds

The story of seeds, in a nutshell, is a tale of evolution. From the tiny sesame that we sprinkle on our bagels to the forty-five-pound double coconut borne by the coco-de-mer tree, seeds are a perpetual reminder of the complexity and diversity of life on earth. With "An Orchard Invisible", Jonathan Silvertown presents the oft-ignored seed with the natural history it deserves, one nearly as varied and surprising as the Earth's flora itself. Beginning with the evolution of the first seed plant from fernlike ancestors more than 360 million years ago, Silvertown carries his tale through epochs and around the globe. 4.5 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
An Orchard Invisible: A Natural History of Seeds

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Science & Nature, Home & Garden
Format Hardback
Pages 224
RRP £17.50
Date of Publication June 2009
ISBN 978-0226757735
Publisher Chicago University Press
 

The story of seeds, in a nutshell, is a tale of evolution. From the tiny sesame that we sprinkle on our bagels to the forty-five-pound double coconut borne by the coco-de-mer tree, seeds are a perpetual reminder of the complexity and diversity of life on earth. With "An Orchard Invisible", Jonathan Silvertown presents the oft-ignored seed with the natural history it deserves, one nearly as varied and surprising as the Earth's flora itself. Beginning with the evolution of the first seed plant from fernlike ancestors more than 360 million years ago, Silvertown carries his tale through epochs and around the globe.

Reviews

The Times Higher Education

Jules Pretty

Fabulous... In this book, Silvertown has produced a gem. "Convince me that you have a seed there," said naturalist Henry David Thoreau, "and I am prepared to express wonders." Read this book as a gardener, scientist, food aficionado, historian, botanist or naturalist, and you'll not be disappointed.

14/05/2009

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The Financial Times

Harry Eyres

An Orchard Invisible contains some dense scientific argument but Silvertown, who is fascinated by the evolutionary strategies of seeds, nevertheless succeeds in making his enthusiasm infectious enough to attract the general reader.

13/06/2009

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