The Wrong Kind Of Snow: How the Weather Made Britain

Antony Woodward, Robert Penn

The Wrong Kind Of Snow: How the Weather Made Britain

It is a fact universally acknowledged that the British are obsessed with the weather. This is not surprising as no country in the world has such unpredictable weather, with such power to rule people's lives. THE WRONG KIND OF SNOW is the complete daily companion to this national phenomenon. From the Spanish Armada to the invention of the windscreen wiper, each of the 365 entries beautifully illustrates a day in the weird and wonderful history of the British and their weather. 4.1 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Wrong Kind Of Snow: How the Weather Made Britain

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Science & Nature, Humour
Format Paperback
Pages 464
RRP £9.99
Date of Publication October 2008
ISBN 978-0340937884
Publisher Hodder
 

It is a fact universally acknowledged that the British are obsessed with the weather. This is not surprising as no country in the world has such unpredictable weather, with such power to rule people's lives. THE WRONG KIND OF SNOW is the complete daily companion to this national phenomenon. From the Spanish Armada to the invention of the windscreen wiper, each of the 365 entries beautifully illustrates a day in the weird and wonderful history of the British and their weather.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Stephen Cave

Endlessly fascinating. It is arranged in calendar format, a day to a page, and combines the tales of monster snowfalls that all these books have in common with first-hand accounts and weather-themed quotes from writers and poets. It is well-researched and written with flair and a feel for the drama of the moment – the perfect book for ensuring you have something to say during that awkward moment at the water cooler.

22/11/2008

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The Independent

Christopher Hirst

The perfect stocking-filler for a weather buff, this book contains a meteorological report for every day of the year. Met men include the Venerable Bede, Jane Austen and Samuel Pepys: "The King said it was the coldest day [16 March 1667] he ever knew in England." 15 October 1987 was the day that Michael Fish said "Don't worry" about a hurricane.

14/11/2008

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The Independent

Tom Boncza-Tomaszewki

This book's subtitle is an utterly spurious assertion, but a great excuse for a book. There's a page for each day of the year, each one offering a weather forecast from the last 50 years, and "quirky, funny, charming, apposite or telling firsthand accounts of weather events" from the days in question... Among the dozens of wonderful stories there's the tale of how Francis Bacon died in 1626 after trying to learn if stuffing a chicken with snow would preserve it. (Or how he may have feigned his death and, "sick of the struggle against penury, ill fame and ingratitude", vanished to France.) Another genius with something to say about the weather was Turner, whose 1845 nautical painting Snow Storm was derided as "soapsuds and whitewash" by the critics. "I wonder what they think the sea's like?" he responded. "I wish they'd been in it."

02/11/2008

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The Daily Mail

Christopher Matthew

Everyone knows that today is the shortest day of the year, but how many know that on December 21, 1796, week-long gales put paid to a planned French invasion that could have ended British rule in Ireland? In The Wrong Kind Of Snow (Hodder and Stoughton, £14.99), Antony Woodward and Robert Penn have had the brilliant idea of using every day of the year to show how, throughout history, our nation has been affected by different sorts of weather and why, contrary to popular belief, there's no such thing as a dreary day ? not in Britain, anyway.

02/01/2008

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The Sunday Times

Susannah Herbet

In theory, this should be very dull indeed. A day-per-page book about the weather? Yet this idiosyncratic accumulation of strange weather-related factoids, quotes and anecdotes has bags of charm. It’s good to learn the day when suicide is most likely (April 6) or the date of Sussex’s only killer avalanche (September 27, 1836). I also loved the entry for August 22, which includes 16 different Welsh expressions for rain including tollti (pouring), byrlymu (pouring very quickly) and mae hi’n bwrw hen wragedd a ffyn (it’s raining old women and sticks).

05/10/2008

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The Times Educational Supplement

John O'Connell

Smart and well-researched almanac – each day has appropriate quotes, often from writers’ diaries, and weather-based trivia. Did you know that skating was invented on December 11?

21/11/2007

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