The Complete Book of Mothers-in-Law

Luisa Dillner

The Complete Book of Mothers-in-Law

Most of us either have a mother-in-law or will be one, and it's not a role most women take on gladly. Mothers-in-law are traditionally the butt of jokes, declared to be nasty, possessive and interfering - but are they really as bad as this reputation suggests? Luisa Dillner looks beyond the stereotype of the mother-in-law and finds they come in many different varieties, from loveable and loyal to lonely, ferocious and scheming. She traces their history, from Ancient Greece and Rome to modern times, through fairy tales and traditions, in this celebration of this most complicated of relationships. 4.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
The Complete Book of Mothers-in-Law

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Humour, Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication October 2008
ISBN 978-0571238194
Publisher Faber & Faber
 

Most of us either have a mother-in-law or will be one, and it's not a role most women take on gladly. Mothers-in-law are traditionally the butt of jokes, declared to be nasty, possessive and interfering - but are they really as bad as this reputation suggests? Luisa Dillner looks beyond the stereotype of the mother-in-law and finds they come in many different varieties, from loveable and loyal to lonely, ferocious and scheming. She traces their history, from Ancient Greece and Rome to modern times, through fairy tales and traditions, in this celebration of this most complicated of relationships.

Reviews

The Observer

Kate Kellaway

Although the book is sympathetic towards the challenges of being a mother-in-law and contains portraits of the best of the breed, it is a far more complicated take on the subject than 'celebration' would suggest. It is rich with mad, bad, dangerous mothers-in-law - and warped son and daughters-in-law. Nor does it try to duck evil-mother-in-law jokes and their history. Yet there is much benign humour too. I particularly liked, even if it is a little hard to believe, the anecdote about Marilyn Monroe meeting Arthur Miller's mother. At the end of dinner, Marilyn slipped away to the lavatory where she ran both taps in order not to overhear Mrs Miller pronounce on her new daughter-in-law. When the verdict came, as it did much later, it was that Marilyn was a 'sweet' girl, but that it was a pity she 'pissed like a horse'.

12/10/2008

Read Full Review


The Scotsman

Jackie McGlone

Interview with Luisa Dillner.

11/10/2008

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore