Disgusting Bliss: The Brass Eye of Chris Morris

Lucian Randall

Disgusting Bliss: The Brass Eye of Chris Morris

Chris Morris first came to national prominence at the heart of a group of virtually unknown comedians brought together by Armando Iannucci. This book follows them from their 1991 news satire On the Hour, which transferred from radio to television where it was reinvented as the equally successful The Day Today. It became impossible to watch bulletins without thinking of Morris's Paxmanesque anchor character chastising a reporter -- 'Peter! You've lost the news!' -- or authoritatively delivering nonsense headlines: 'Sacked chimney worker pumps boss full of mayonnaise.' Meanwhile co-star Steve Coogan created a lasting anti-hero in Alan Partridge, imbued with a horrible life all of his own. But Morris himself was always the most compelling character of all. Drawing on new interviews and original research, this book paints a portrait of Morris from his earliest radio days, and of the comedians and writers who frequently took on the industry they worked in. 3.5 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Disgusting Bliss: The Brass Eye of Chris Morris

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Humour
Format Paperback
Pages 288
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication April 2010
ISBN 978-1847371386
Publisher Simon & Schuster
 

Chris Morris first came to national prominence at the heart of a group of virtually unknown comedians brought together by Armando Iannucci. This book follows them from their 1991 news satire On the Hour, which transferred from radio to television where it was reinvented as the equally successful The Day Today. It became impossible to watch bulletins without thinking of Morris's Paxmanesque anchor character chastising a reporter -- 'Peter! You've lost the news!' -- or authoritatively delivering nonsense headlines: 'Sacked chimney worker pumps boss full of mayonnaise.' Meanwhile co-star Steve Coogan created a lasting anti-hero in Alan Partridge, imbued with a horrible life all of his own. But Morris himself was always the most compelling character of all. Drawing on new interviews and original research, this book paints a portrait of Morris from his earliest radio days, and of the comedians and writers who frequently took on the industry they worked in.

Reviews

The New Statesman

Sophie Elmhirst

Randall is as devoted to his subject as Morris's most loyal collaborators. Sometimes this can feel fawning: the final page is rather gushing in its praise of Morris's "devastating effect" and the "profoundly emotional resonance" of his work. But, for the most part, Randall venerates his subject with a purpose, and we end up with a fascinating account of a working life.

16/04/2010

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The Observer

Elizabeth Day

Impeccably researched and fluently written, Disgusting Bliss paints Morris as a frantic-minded perfectionist, a visionary unwilling to cede control of his projects. He emerges from this biography as someone maniacally convinced of the rightness of his vision, who steamrollers opposition and approaches controversy with relish.

04/04/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Sameer Rahim

Randall cites many examples of Morris’s personal kindness and generosity.

15/04/2010

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The Independent

Arifa Akbar

[An] illuminating, if all too admiring life story

09/04/2010

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