The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee

Sarah Silverman

The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee

Sarah Silverman’s father taught her to curse—at the age of three. She was a chronic bedwetter—until she was old enough to drive. She lost her virginity at age 19—but didn’t really know it. These are just a few of the outrageous true tales that Silverman shares in her alternately hilarious and moving collection of autobiographical essays. With her signature taboo-breaking humour, Silverman writes on everything from her epic struggle with hairy arms (there wasn’t enough wax in the world) to the death of her infant brother (It was Nana’s fault) and always leaves the reader with a smile. Mixed in among the essays are scores of embarrassing photos, mortifying childhood diary entries, and truly humiliating e-mails to and from her comedian friends. 3.0 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Humour
Format Hardback
Pages 256
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication September 2010
ISBN 978-0571251261
Publisher Faber & Faber
 

Sarah Silverman’s father taught her to curse—at the age of three. She was a chronic bedwetter—until she was old enough to drive. She lost her virginity at age 19—but didn’t really know it. These are just a few of the outrageous true tales that Silverman shares in her alternately hilarious and moving collection of autobiographical essays. With her signature taboo-breaking humour, Silverman writes on everything from her epic struggle with hairy arms (there wasn’t enough wax in the world) to the death of her infant brother (It was Nana’s fault) and always leaves the reader with a smile. Mixed in among the essays are scores of embarrassing photos, mortifying childhood diary entries, and truly humiliating e-mails to and from her comedian friends.

Reviews

The New York Times

Dave Itzkoff

[An] often hilarious and occasionally revelatory memoir... Once Ms. Silverman has established herself as a performer unafraid to discuss unpleasant truths and bodily functions and has risen from New York University dropout to staple of the New York comedy scene, a reader’s interest in the rest of her memoir may depend on having a curiosity about the inner workings of show business.

03/05/2010

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The Independent

Fiona Sturges

Descriptions of the backroom banter on Saturday Night Live, and on her own show, The Sarah Silverman Program, offer gleeful insight into the baser instincts of some of America's greatest comic talents ... But Silverman takes the demystification process too far when she attempts to fend off criticism of her most controversial outbursts ... It's whiny, self-indulgent and at odds with her previous remarks about the pointlessness of defending one's own material.

10/09/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Joshua Sandoval

Silverman's stand-up delivery transitions nicely to the page as she jumps from soft, sensitive subjects to taboos and tense topics… Not all of Silverman's stories, however, are as mind-bending as the tale of her misguided attempt to spear a pencil through Al Franken's hair

04/05/2010

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The New Yorker

Books Briefly Noted

Absorbing, amusing, and, at times, even moving, the book ultimately suffers from both haphazard organization and a glibness that, though possibly an asset in standup, denies Silverman’s story the degree of self-examination it needs.

14/06/2010

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The Sunday Times

Stephen Armstrong

...she spends more time discussing the effects of the writers’ strike on her recording schedule than she ever does examining the effects of huge tranquilliser doses on a teenage girl. For those familiar with Silverman’s comedy — if not, then her live DVD Jesus Is Magic is a good place to start — this may help you understand how and why she gets herself into so much trouble. Because what she loves to do is focus on the detail instead of emotion.

29/08/2010

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The Observer

Stephanie Merritt

Paradoxically, it's in those parts where she is most self-consciously being funny that the book is least interesting and original… Silverman is clearly a fiercely intelligent and driven woman and this memoir is an entertaining but ultimately unsatisfying experience.

22/08/2010

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