Stalin Ate My Homework

Alexei Sayle

Stalin Ate My Homework

Alexei Sayle was born in Liverpool on the day egg rationing came to an end. His family ate salad. They read the Soviet Weekly. They travelled on transcontinental trains, and in the back of futuristic limousines. They saw Communism in action and ate strange smelling sausages. His mother was very keen on boiled eggs and the Moscow State Circus. Teachers were scared of her. His father was a union leader who made friends wherever he went. He thought he was fluent in Esperanto. Alexei became a member of the Czechoslovakian Young Pioneers. Sometimes he was bored and other times confused. He thought he might be a great athlete, or maybe a famous artist. He spent a lot of time inventing complex explanations for the bizarre behaviour of grown-ups. Slowly it dawned on him that telling stories was a good way of making sense of his perplexing world. 3.9 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Stalin Ate My Homework

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Humour
Format Hardback
Pages 320
RRP £20.00
Date of Publication September 2010
ISBN 978-0340919576
Publisher Sceptre
 

Alexei Sayle was born in Liverpool on the day egg rationing came to an end. His family ate salad. They read the Soviet Weekly. They travelled on transcontinental trains, and in the back of futuristic limousines. They saw Communism in action and ate strange smelling sausages. His mother was very keen on boiled eggs and the Moscow State Circus. Teachers were scared of her. His father was a union leader who made friends wherever he went. He thought he was fluent in Esperanto. Alexei became a member of the Czechoslovakian Young Pioneers. Sometimes he was bored and other times confused. He thought he might be a great athlete, or maybe a famous artist. He spent a lot of time inventing complex explanations for the bizarre behaviour of grown-ups. Slowly it dawned on him that telling stories was a good way of making sense of his perplexing world.

Reviews

The Guardian

Ian Sansom

It is not like other comedians' memoirs. It's funny.

16/10/2010

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The Times

Iain Finlayson

[Alexei Sayle's] warm-hearted, portrait of his parents is also the cleverly tragicomic story of his own cultural development in a society finding its feet in a world of revolutionary politics.

18/09/2010

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The Sunday Times

Roland White

Despite Sayle’s day job as a comedian, his book is not laugh-out-loud funny. But he is a fine writer who has produced a childhood memoir (Cider with Russki?) that captures both the warmth of his family life, and the contradictions of the politics, of which the young Sayle seemed well aware.

29/08/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

David Evans

The comedy boom of recent years has led to a glut of dull autobiographies by stand-ups eager to cash in on their celebrity. Michael McIntyre's insipid bestseller Life and Laughing is a case in point. One could be forgiven, then, for approaching Alexei Sayle's Stalin Ate My Homework with trepidation, but this touching, elegantly written memoir stands out from the dross.

10/07/2011

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