Bossypants

Tina Fey

Bossypants

Before 30 Rock, Mean Girls and 'Sarah Palin', Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV. She has seen both these dreams come true. At last, Tina Fey's story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon — from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence. Tina Fey reveals all, and proves what we've all suspected: you're no one until someone calls you bossy. 3.4 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Bossypants

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Humour
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication April 2011
ISBN 978-1847445162
Publisher Sphere
 

Before 30 Rock, Mean Girls and 'Sarah Palin', Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV. She has seen both these dreams come true. At last, Tina Fey's story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon — from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence. Tina Fey reveals all, and proves what we've all suspected: you're no one until someone calls you bossy.

Read an extract from the book | Guardian

Reviews

The Los Angeles Times

Mary McNamara

Amazingly, absurdly, deliriously funny … any concern that Fey, like so many before her, has been ruined by fame is quickly dispelled by Bossypants, a book that reminds you why Fey has succeeded where so many have failed — because she is precise, professional and hilarious.

04/04/2011

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The Times

Dominic Maxwell

It is probably best savoured in chunks, for the same reason that a dazzlingly inventive 23-minute sitcom might wear thin over two hours. The wit invites, reveals and holds just a little bit back. Yet you can open it at random and find something personal, funny and surprising.

23/04/2011

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The New York Times

Janet Maslin

... a spiky blend of humor, introspection, critical thinking and Nora Ephron-isms for a new generation ... For all Ms Fey’s efforts to depict herself as “a little tiny person with nothing to worry about running in circles, worried out of her mind,” she comes off as a strongly opinionated dynamo with a comedic voice that is totally her own.

03/04/2011

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The Washington Post

Nicole Arthur

At times, it’s almost like Fey and Liz Lemon, the self-loathing comedy writer Fey plays on ["30 Rock"], are struggling, exorcism-style, for control of the book: Just as Fey lets her guard down and introduces a serious topic, Lemon milks it for the gag. But that’s okay — because I would gladly read a book by Liz Lemon. In fact, I have.

11/04/2011

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The Sunday Times

Camilla Long

Sure, she is biting, snappy, droll. But if you are looking for consistency, depth or personal revelation, go elsewhere. In fact, she will do almost anything for a laugh. Her repeated insistence that she is ugly is good comic territory, but grates after a while: as a former Vogue cover girl, unattractive she is not. She is great on girlie chat, back fat, thin lips, “crotch biscuits” (the “wobbly triangles on one’s inner thighs”) and periods (“I knew from commercials that one’s menstrual period was a blue liquid”), but dodges any real feminist argument.

24/04/2011

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The Observer

Carole Cadwalladr

There's lots to enjoy, particularly if you are, as I am, a Tina Fey fan girl. It's just the bookiness of it. Fey is out of her genre, and it shows: it takes an age to get going, and it's less like prose non-fiction than a sketch comedy in book form, with a disproportionate number of one-liners, not all of which work.

24/04/2011

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