Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son

Roger Mortimer, Charlie Mortimer

Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son

Nostalgic, witty and filled with characters and situations that people of all ages will recognise, Dear Lupin is the entire correspondence of a Father to his only son, spanning nearly 25 years. Roger Mortimer's sometimes hilarious, sometimes touching, always generous letters to his son are packed with anecdotes and sharp observations, with a unique analogy for each and every scrape Charlie Mortimer got himself into. The trials and tribulations of his youth and early adulthood are received by his father with humour, understanding and a touch of resignation, making them the perfect reminder of when letters were common, but always special. A racing journalist himself, Roger Mortimer wrote for a living, yet still wrote more than 150 letters to his son as he left school, and lived in places such as South America, Africa, Weston-super-Mare and eventually London. These letters form a memoir of their relationship, and an affectionate portrait of a time gone by. 4.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Essays, Journals & Letters, Humour
Format Hardback
Pages 192
RRP
Date of Publication May 2012
ISBN 978-1780330037
Publisher Constable
 

Nostalgic, witty and filled with characters and situations that people of all ages will recognise, Dear Lupin is the entire correspondence of a Father to his only son, spanning nearly 25 years. Roger Mortimer's sometimes hilarious, sometimes touching, always generous letters to his son are packed with anecdotes and sharp observations, with a unique analogy for each and every scrape Charlie Mortimer got himself into. The trials and tribulations of his youth and early adulthood are received by his father with humour, understanding and a touch of resignation, making them the perfect reminder of when letters were common, but always special. A racing journalist himself, Roger Mortimer wrote for a living, yet still wrote more than 150 letters to his son as he left school, and lived in places such as South America, Africa, Weston-super-Mare and eventually London. These letters form a memoir of their relationship, and an affectionate portrait of a time gone by.

Read an extract from the book | Daily Mail

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Jessamy Calkin

In an era when letter writing is a vanishing art form, this idiosyncratic collection from a father to his errant son is a delight.

09/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Roland White

Very, very funny ... It’s sad to think that this might be one of the last of a literary genre. Do parents still write long and amusing letters to their offspring? (Emails don’t count.) Even the tone seems of another age. The style has touches of the Dear Bill letters from 1980s Private Eye, full of retired army officers and fierce women. (“Miss Hislop went berserk at the Loyd’s ball,” Roger writes in 1973. “She kicked Lady Dartmouth up the arse and called her a dreary old bag.”)

13/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Sam Leith

If you're one of those flinty-hearted souls not charmed by books where everyone's pissed up on gin, has a nickname like Pongo, Bingbong or Wiffwaff and comments that the doctors in a hospital are "as black as ten feet up a factory chimney", this may not be for you. It's of that world, though less PG Wodehouse than Cold Comfort Farm: something between a posh English version of Shit My Dad Says, and the self-knowing curmudgeonry of Roger Lewis's Seasonal Suicide Notes. It is often funny, of its kind... But these letters also say something a little poignant about how upper-class (they insist "middle-class", but they're not middle-class as most of us would recognise it) men of that generation communicate, or fail to.

12/05/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore