Why is Q Always Followed by U

Michael Quinion

Why is Q Always Followed by U

Long-time word-detective and bestselling author of Port Out, Starboard Home, Michael Quinion brings us the answers to nearly two hundred of the most intriguing questions he’s been asked about language over the years. Sent to him by enquiring readers from all around the globe, Michael’s answers about the meanings and histories behind the quirky phrases, slang and language that we all use are set to delight, amuse and enlighten even the most hardened word-obsessive. Did you know that ‘Blighty’ comes from an ancient Arabic word? Or that Liberace cried his way to the bank so many times people think he came up with the phrase? That ‘cloud nine’ started out as ‘cloud seven’ in the speakeasies of ’30s America? And that the first person to have their thunder stolen was a dismal playwright from Drury Lane? 3.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Why is Q Always Followed by U

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Language & Linguistics
Format Hardback
Pages 304
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication July 2009
ISBN 978-1846141843
Publisher Particular Books
 

Long-time word-detective and bestselling author of Port Out, Starboard Home, Michael Quinion brings us the answers to nearly two hundred of the most intriguing questions he’s been asked about language over the years. Sent to him by enquiring readers from all around the globe, Michael’s answers about the meanings and histories behind the quirky phrases, slang and language that we all use are set to delight, amuse and enlighten even the most hardened word-obsessive. Did you know that ‘Blighty’ comes from an ancient Arabic word? Or that Liberace cried his way to the bank so many times people think he came up with the phrase? That ‘cloud nine’ started out as ‘cloud seven’ in the speakeasies of ’30s America? And that the first person to have their thunder stolen was a dismal playwright from Drury Lane?

Reviews

The Guardian

Steven Poole

This amiable word-nerd's miscellany is somewhat mistitled, as apart from the title entry (on changing alphabets and guttural "k" sounds) it is mainly concerned with investigating the origin of English idioms... The author has an admirable penchant for quoting from Wodehouse and The Goon Show, and the fallacious origins he considers and then dismisses are often more entertaining than the accurate ones (Janet Street-Porter and Simon Mayo are ticked off for supposing that "twaddle" is connected with David Cameron's favourite word, "twat"...)

22/08/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore