Mick Jagger

Philip Norman

Mick Jagger

Bestselling biographer Philip Norman offers an unparalleled account of the life of a living legend, Mick Jagger. From Home Counties schoolboy, to rebel without a cause to Sixties rock sensation and global idol, Norman unravels with astonishing intimacy the myth of the inimitable frontman of The Rolling Stones. MICK JAGGER charts his extraordinary journey through scandal-ridden conspiracy, infamous prison spell, hordes of female admirers and a knighthood while stripping away the colossal fame, wealth and idolatry to reveal a story of talent and promise unfulfilled. 3.5 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Mick Jagger

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Music, Stage & Screen
Format Hardback
Pages 640
RRP
Date of Publication October 2012
ISBN 978-0007329496
Publisher HarperCollins
 

Bestselling biographer Philip Norman offers an unparalleled account of the life of a living legend, Mick Jagger. From Home Counties schoolboy, to rebel without a cause to Sixties rock sensation and global idol, Norman unravels with astonishing intimacy the myth of the inimitable frontman of The Rolling Stones. MICK JAGGER charts his extraordinary journey through scandal-ridden conspiracy, infamous prison spell, hordes of female admirers and a knighthood while stripping away the colossal fame, wealth and idolatry to reveal a story of talent and promise unfulfilled.

Life by Keith Richards

Reviews

The Spectator

Paul Whitelaw

Despite his penchant for detail, Norman could never be accused of being a dry, academic biographer. Adopting a wry tone befitting his habitually self-mocking subject, he rarely passes up an opportunity for an ironic aside. Indeed, at times he’d be best advised to avoid a tempting pun or gag, as they often irritate rather than amuse ... Nevertheless, having breathed new life into familiar material, he’s written what must surely be regarded as the definitive account of Jagger’s remarkable life.

20/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Independent

John Walsh

Norman tends to see sex everywhere in the songs: "Satisfaction" is apparently "a hymn to masturbation" with the first-ever reference in a song to menstruation ("Baby, better come back, maybe next week") Hello? And he overdoes the Mars Bar gags. But otherwise his book is a nicely sardonic history of the maddest decade in the last 100 years, and a fascinating study of an invented rebel who re-invented himself as a self-controlled conformist.

06/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Charles Shaar Murray

Norman acknowledges that the band’s first quarter-century was considerably more interesting than the second. The book reflects this: we’re more than two-thirds of the way through before we’re done with the fraught sessions that produced their 1972 masterpiece Exile On Main Street. But fast-forwarding through the latter stages harms the story not at all. Norman tells it with commendable thoroughness, engaging wit and boundless energy, much as Jagger has shown over the decades.

15/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Fiona MacCarthy

It has to be said that the second half of this biography flags and becomes just a little repetitious. There is too much about Jagger mingling with the aristocrats, too many scenes of drug-taking, too much of both together, as when Marianne Faithfull at a banquet given by the Earl of Warwick "took five Mandrax tablets by way of hors d'oeuvres and passed out into her soup". But what the book does establish, in spite of the commotion there has always been around him, is Jagger's remarkable consistency both as a performer (still singing "Satisfaction") and major countercultural influence.

06/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Lynn Barber

This is a sound, readable and generally reliable biography — except that he occasionally unleashes flashes of pure hatred for his subject. Commenting on Jagger’s 2003 knighthood, for instance, he says that it was odd to get a gong for a career “exclusively given over to egotism, selfishness and greed”. He also, weirdly, seems to think that Sir Mick is a bit of a failure — he could have been a film star or a politician “instead of merely fronting a band”. Merely? Is he mad?

07/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Express

Duncan Fallowell

If I hear about Anita Pallenberg again I’ll scream. It is an era rich in anecdotes illustrating major social change but Norman’s overblown paragraphs are a strain … The best biographies are subtly empathetic, my biggest beef is this never misses a chance to be nasty.

12/10/2012

Read Full Review


The Observer

Julie Burchill

[A] 600-page deadly weapon of a book… As I advanced wearily through this book, I could have sworn I'd already read it. That's because most people over the age of 40 could recite the two-timing-table of Jagger's life without even having to think twice.

21/10/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore