Remembering Our Childhood: How Memory Betrays Us

Karl Sabbagh

Remembering Our Childhood: How Memory Betrays Us

Karl Sabbagh looks at psychologists' present understanding of the nature of memory, especially recollections of childhood, and how, in cases of so-called 'recovered memories', the unreliability and flexibility of memory has led to tragic consequences, destroying the lives of whole families. All of us have memories of childhood - that special trip to the fair, or impressions, such as dappled sunlight through rustling leaves seen from the pram. Some people firmly believe that they can recall scenes from the time they were babies. But what does science tell us about the nature of memory, and memories of childhood? 4.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Remembering Our Childhood: How Memory Betrays Us

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Psychology & Psychiatry
Format Hardback
Pages 256
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication January 2009
ISBN 978-0199218400
Publisher OUP
 

Karl Sabbagh looks at psychologists' present understanding of the nature of memory, especially recollections of childhood, and how, in cases of so-called 'recovered memories', the unreliability and flexibility of memory has led to tragic consequences, destroying the lives of whole families. All of us have memories of childhood - that special trip to the fair, or impressions, such as dappled sunlight through rustling leaves seen from the pram. Some people firmly believe that they can recall scenes from the time they were babies. But what does science tell us about the nature of memory, and memories of childhood?

Reviews

The Financial Times

William Leith

If you were to take a single point from this complex and rigorous book on memory, it would be this: “ALL memory, whatever age it is laid down or recalled, is unreliable.”... Some of us think we have very clear recollections of events that took place when we were toddlers, or even babies...But is this real memory? Or is it something else? ... [The book is] never less than fascinating.

14/02/2009

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