The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything

Ken Robinson, Lou Aronica

The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything

The element is the point at which natural talent meets personal passion. This groundbreaking new book is all about how every one of us can find our element, connecting with our true talents and fulfilling our creative potential. Creativity expert Ken Robinson believes that we are all born with tremendous natural capacities, but that we lose touch with them as we spend more time in the world. Whether it’s a child bored in class, an employee being misused or just someone who feels frustrated but can’t quite explain why, too many people don’t know what they are really capable of achieving. Education, business and society as a whole are losing out. The Element draws on the stories of a wide range of people – from ex-Beatle Paul McCartney to renowned physicist Richard Feynman and many others, including business leaders and athletes – showing how all of them came to recognize their unique talents and were able to make a successful living doing what they love. Ken Robinson looks at the conditions that enable us to find ourselves in the element, and those that stifle that possibility. He shows that age and occupation are no barrier and he argues that there is an urgent need to enhance creativity and innovation by thinking differently about ourselves. 4.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Psychology & Psychiatry, Business, Finance & Law
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication February 2009
ISBN 978-1846141966
Publisher Allen Lane
 

The element is the point at which natural talent meets personal passion. This groundbreaking new book is all about how every one of us can find our element, connecting with our true talents and fulfilling our creative potential. Creativity expert Ken Robinson believes that we are all born with tremendous natural capacities, but that we lose touch with them as we spend more time in the world. Whether it’s a child bored in class, an employee being misused or just someone who feels frustrated but can’t quite explain why, too many people don’t know what they are really capable of achieving. Education, business and society as a whole are losing out. The Element draws on the stories of a wide range of people – from ex-Beatle Paul McCartney to renowned physicist Richard Feynman and many others, including business leaders and athletes – showing how all of them came to recognize their unique talents and were able to make a successful living doing what they love. Ken Robinson looks at the conditions that enable us to find ourselves in the element, and those that stifle that possibility. He shows that age and occupation are no barrier and he argues that there is an urgent need to enhance creativity and innovation by thinking differently about ourselves.

Reviews

The Guardian

Steven Poole

[A] sympathetic and interesting book... [Robinson] emphasises that there is a lot more to be valued in the mind than higher reasoning: there are "multiple intelligences ... linguistic, musical, mathematical, spatial, kinesthetic, interpersonal ... and intra-personal". This kind of thing is always a useful corrective to the kind of smug liberal-arts columnist who mocks the alleged "stupidity" of footballers, though the danger is that if you protest too much in the other direction...it looks as though you are arguing that what is needed in the world is less reason, rather than more.

28/02/2009

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