Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You

Sam Gosling

Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You

For readers of "Blink" and "Freakonomics", a fascinating book about what our everyday actions and possessions reveal about our personalities, whether we know it or not...Does what's in your bathroom or on your desk reveal what's on your mind? Is your choice of food or the way you sleep about to give you away? And why do handshakes display how outgoing we are more than our bedrooms? For ten years Sam Gosling has been studying how people project (and protect) their inner selves, and how we form impressions of others. One of the world's most ingenious researchers, he dispatches teams of scientific snoops to poke around in people's homes and offices, and discovers that our possessions and daily lives can unexpectedly say more about us, often when the information is cleverly combined, than our most intimate conversations.Once you know what to look for, you can see how reliable a new boyfriend is by peeking into his medicine cabinet or whether an employee is committed to her job by analyzing her desk. The bottom line: the insights we gain can boost our understanding of ourselves and sharpen our perceptions of others. 2.5 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Psychology & Psychiatry, Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £15.00
Date of Publication June 2008
ISBN 978-1846680182
Publisher Profile
 

For readers of "Blink" and "Freakonomics", a fascinating book about what our everyday actions and possessions reveal about our personalities, whether we know it or not...Does what's in your bathroom or on your desk reveal what's on your mind? Is your choice of food or the way you sleep about to give you away? And why do handshakes display how outgoing we are more than our bedrooms? For ten years Sam Gosling has been studying how people project (and protect) their inner selves, and how we form impressions of others. One of the world's most ingenious researchers, he dispatches teams of scientific snoops to poke around in people's homes and offices, and discovers that our possessions and daily lives can unexpectedly say more about us, often when the information is cleverly combined, than our most intimate conversations.Once you know what to look for, you can see how reliable a new boyfriend is by peeking into his medicine cabinet or whether an employee is committed to her job by analyzing her desk. The bottom line: the insights we gain can boost our understanding of ourselves and sharpen our perceptions of others.

Reviews

The Spectator

William Leith

What I wanted from Gosling’s book was a series of concrete answers. The thing is that these answers don’t yet exist. This area of anthropology, as Gosling says, is still young... Perhaps the best thing Gosling comes up with is his analysis of people’s record collections. Here, he has discovered something concrete... I look forward to more of this from Gosling as his subject area develops.

16/07/2008

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The Times

Mark Stafford

...what we have here is always a little too elementary. I defy anyone to hear this amateur detective explain that “[e-mail] user names can give us clues about how people see themselves”, or “males' rooms are different from those belonging to females” without shouting: “No s***, Sherlock!”

11/07/2008

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