Delusions of Gender: The Real Science Behind Sex Differences

Cordelia Fine

Delusions of Gender: The Real Science Behind Sex Differences

Sex discrimination is supposedly a distant memory. Yet popular books, magazines and even scientific articles increasingly defend inequalities by citing immutable biological differences between the male and female brain. That's the reason, we're told, that there are so few women in science and engineering, so few men in the laundry room — different brains are just better suited to different things. Drawing on the latest research in developmental psychology, neuroscience, and social psychology, Delusions of Gender powerfully rebuts these claims, showing how old myths, dressed up in new scientific finery, are helping perpetuate the sexist status quo. 3.9 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Delusions of Gender: The Real Science Behind Sex Differences

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy, Psychology & Psychiatry
Format Paperback
Pages 368
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication February 2011
ISBN 978-1848312203
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Sex discrimination is supposedly a distant memory. Yet popular books, magazines and even scientific articles increasingly defend inequalities by citing immutable biological differences between the male and female brain. That's the reason, we're told, that there are so few women in science and engineering, so few men in the laundry room — different brains are just better suited to different things. Drawing on the latest research in developmental psychology, neuroscience, and social psychology, Delusions of Gender powerfully rebuts these claims, showing how old myths, dressed up in new scientific finery, are helping perpetuate the sexist status quo.

Reviews

The Times Higher Education

Hilary Rose

… a book that sparkles with wit, which is easy to read but underpinned by substantial scholarship and a formidable 100-page bibliography … brilliant

30/09/2010

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Times Literary Supplement

Carol Tavris

… a witty and meticulously researched exposé of the sloppy studies that pass for scientific evidence in so many of today’s bestselling books on sex differences … anyone else who would like to know what today’s best science reveals about gender differences – and similarities – could not do better than read this book.

26/01/2011

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The Washington Post

Wray Herbert

[An] irreverent and important book … She isn't opposed to neuroscience or brain imaging; quite the opposite. But she is ardently against making authoritative interpretations of ambiguous data. And she's especially intolerant of any intellectual leap from analyzing iffy brain data to justifying a society stratified by gender.

12/09/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Katy Guest

Fascinating … The hard data is illuminating, and engaging, but Fine manages a light touch throughout. This is a truly startling book.

13/02/2011

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The New York Times

Katherine Boulton

The author, Cordelia Fine, who has a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from University College London, is an acerbic critic, mincing no words when it comes to those she disagrees with. But her sharp tongue is tempered with humor and linguistic playfulness, as the title itself suggests.

23/08/2010

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The Guardian

Terri Apter

Perhaps Fine is too intent on referencing every argument to move beyond the data, but it is regrettable that she does not go further. Among our wonderful genetic gifts is the ability to change our environment so that our genetic inheritance can be expressed in unprecedented ways. The eagerness and recklessness with which we devour theories about gender suggest a hungry imagination, waiting to feed on ideas of real substance.

11/09/2010

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The Independent

Christopher Hart

The gendering of children, ("the pernicious pinkification of little girls") affects every aspect of their lives. An ironic book with a serious message, it points out that adults also obey this rigid code.

18/02/2011

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