Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain

David Eagleman

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain

If the conscious mind — the part you consider you — is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing? In this book, neuroscientist and author of SUM, David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you notice when your name is mentioned in a conversation that you didn't think you were listening to? Why are people whose name begins with J more likely to marry other people whose name begins with J? Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synaesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence and visual illusions, Incognito is a a subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions. 3.1 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Science & Nature, Psychology & Psychiatry
Format Hardback
Pages 272
RRP £20.00
Date of Publication April 2011
ISBN 978-1847679383
Publisher Canongate
 

If the conscious mind — the part you consider you — is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing? In this book, neuroscientist and author of SUM, David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you notice when your name is mentioned in a conversation that you didn't think you were listening to? Why are people whose name begins with J more likely to marry other people whose name begins with J? Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synaesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence and visual illusions, Incognito is a a subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

SUM: FORTY TALES FROM THE AFTERLIVES by David Eagleman

Read an interview with David Eagleman | The Scotsman

Reviews

The Sunday Times

Ian Critchley

... Incognito is at its most interesting when discussing how far the legal system should incorporate the latest neuroscientific research. Although his informal tone occasionally grates, Eagleman provides an excellent overview of the workings of our most vital organ.

17/04/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Laurence Phelan

… a shining example of lucid and easy-to-grasp science writing. Which isn't to say that it is reductionist ("By itself, the biology only gives partial insight"), nor that there's no space for poetic phrasing (information is carried by "flotilla of drifting molecules"). Nor does Eagleman feel bound by his field. Neuroscience is at a stage, he argues, where it can weigh in on age-old philosophical debates.

17/04/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Forbes

You will learn a great deal that is fascinating from Incognito, but if you've read SUM, what you will miss is the searing moral insight, the dramatic denouements. Despite Eagleman's passionate advocacy, neuroscience cannot deliver that kind of certainty.

30/04/2011

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The Observer

Alexander Linklater

This book belongs to a popular trend of neuro-hubris — wildly overstating the ramifications of a science that is still in its infancy … The contrast with SUM could not be more vivid. Eagleman is the rarest kind of science writer: better at translating his knowledge into fiction than explaining it as fact.

24/04/2011

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