Underneath the Lemon Tree: A Memoir of Depression and Recovery

Mark Rice-Oxley

Underneath the Lemon Tree: A Memoir of Depression and Recovery

On paper, things looked good for Mark Rice-Oxley: wife, children, fulfilling job. But then, at his 40th birthday party, his whole world crumbled as he succumbed to depression... How many men do you know who have been through periods when their lives haven't seemed right? How badly askew were things for them? Many men suffer from depression yet it is still a subject that is taboo. Men often don't visit the doctor, or they don't want to face up to feelings of weakness and vulnerability. By telling his story, Mark Rice-Oxley hopes it will enable others to tell theirs. 3.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Underneath the Lemon Tree: A Memoir of Depression and Recovery

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Psychology & Psychiatry, Health & Medical
Format Paperback
Pages 320
RRP
Date of Publication March 2012
ISBN 978-1408703786
Publisher Little, Brown
 

On paper, things looked good for Mark Rice-Oxley: wife, children, fulfilling job. But then, at his 40th birthday party, his whole world crumbled as he succumbed to depression... How many men do you know who have been through periods when their lives haven't seemed right? How badly askew were things for them? Many men suffer from depression yet it is still a subject that is taboo. Men often don't visit the doctor, or they don't want to face up to feelings of weakness and vulnerability. By telling his story, Mark Rice-Oxley hopes it will enable others to tell theirs.

How I survived a nervous breakdown | Mark Rice-Oxley | Telegraph

Reviews

The Financial Times

Christopher Bray

Rice-Oxley comes over all Robert Ludlum when he starts talking about “the serotonin conjecture”. But you don’t have to be the hero of a conspiracy thriller to wonder whether the victims of depression might also be victims of Big Pharma boosterism.

16/03/2012

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The Independent

Leyla Sanai

Moving … He details with clarity and cogency his experience, the professionals he saw, the effects on him and his family, and his treatment, which included medications and sessions with eminent experts. The descriptions of his desperation, anxiety and insomnia are powerfully evocative.

13/04/2012

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The Times

Iain Finlayson

Despite the recent flood of confessional books, laying out personal agonies like entrails on an altar of misery for interpretation by the public haruspecis, it still takes guts in this age of affluence to admit to personal failure ... With candour for himself and compassion for others, Rice-Oxley becomes his own case study.

17/03/2012

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