From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Legacy

Kenan Malik

From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Legacy

On the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Rushdie fatwa, "From Fatwa to Jihad" tells, for the first time, the full story of this defining episode and explores its repercussions and resonance through to contemporary debates about Islam, terror, free speech and Western values. 4.3 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Legacy

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Religion & Spirituality, Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Hardback
Pages 272
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication April 2009
ISBN 978-1843548232
Publisher Atlantic
 

On the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Rushdie fatwa, "From Fatwa to Jihad" tells, for the first time, the full story of this defining episode and explores its repercussions and resonance through to contemporary debates about Islam, terror, free speech and Western values.

Reviews

The Independent

Lisa Appignanesi

[An] important and incisive study... Recent history has a way of becoming too quickly forgotten, its shifts naturalised so that current assumptions take on the aura of "forever". Impeccably researched, brimming with detail, yet razor-sharp in its argument, this book provokes a necessary re-examination.

10/04/2009

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The Scotsman

Stuart Kelly

An admirable piece of reportage... Subtle and intelligent though this book is, I can't help regretting Malik didn't deal with some of the wider issues. Rushdie's career after The Satanic Verses is barely mentioned – and his latest novel is a terrible example of bland multiculturalism. The racism of the 80s was more than just National Front thugs: Rushdie's own publishers also published the Koran as a "classic", but with all the suras re-ordered...

05/04/2009

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The Sunday Times

Bryan Appleyard

From Fatwa to Jihad tells, for the most part brilliantly, this baleful tale... [The book] sags in its last third. Up to then, Malik does a terrific job of making points through stories; after that he descends into mere argument. This narrows his focus when it should be broadened. It also means that he effectively evades the biggest issue of all. He wants to defend the universal values of the Enlightenment, but he doesn’t confront the real problem with this — people.

05/04/2009

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