Keepers of the Keys of Heaven: A History Of The Papacy

Roger Collins

Keepers of the Keys of Heaven: A History Of The Papacy

Since its emergence from the ruins of the Roman Empire, the Papacy has represented the most extraordinary continuation of earthly power from the decline of the Roman empire to the collapse of Communism in the late twentieth century and beyond. The Papacy has faced many crises - dangers from within and assaults from without. For many centuries it only survived by timely alliances and clandestine pacts with Europe's kings and princes. But it did survive - to organize the Crusades and the Counter-Reformation and send papal missions and missionaries throughout the world. After 1870 it lost the Papal States and became a spiritual institution rather than a temporal power. This single-volume history of the Papacy looks into the character and policies of individual popes, the development of the Curia, the administration of the Papal States, issues of theology and canon law, the papacy's relationship with the city of Rome, the long tradition of artistic patronage, and much more. 4.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Keepers of the Keys of Heaven: A History Of The Papacy

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre History, Religion & Spirituality
Format Hardback
Pages 592
RRP £30.00
Date of Publication March 2009
ISBN 978-0297847618
Publisher Weidenfeld & Nicolson
 

Since its emergence from the ruins of the Roman Empire, the Papacy has represented the most extraordinary continuation of earthly power from the decline of the Roman empire to the collapse of Communism in the late twentieth century and beyond. The Papacy has faced many crises - dangers from within and assaults from without. For many centuries it only survived by timely alliances and clandestine pacts with Europe's kings and princes. But it did survive - to organize the Crusades and the Counter-Reformation and send papal missions and missionaries throughout the world. After 1870 it lost the Papal States and became a spiritual institution rather than a temporal power. This single-volume history of the Papacy looks into the character and policies of individual popes, the development of the Curia, the administration of the Papal States, issues of theology and canon law, the papacy's relationship with the city of Rome, the long tradition of artistic patronage, and much more.

Reviews

The Sunday Times

Peter Stanford

Collins breaks no new ground in the sources he uses or his straightforward chronological approach. Rather, he attempts to distinguish himself and his book by his tone and his judgments. On the first count, he succeeds. Always accessible, the pages are broken into bite-size sections that mix the ecclesiastical with the political and social... And, on the second, he is impeccably fair and even detached when it comes to analysing controversial actions... [A] vast and admirable tome

12/04/2009

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