Global Catholicism: Diversity and Change Since Vatican II

Ian Linden

Global Catholicism: Diversity and Change Since Vatican II

Ian Linden has been an active lay member of the Catholic Church for many years and has witnessed firsthand such important movements as liberation theology. In this book, he charts the complex history of the forces of renewal unleashed by the Second Vatican Council and the counter-forces that gathered during the last half century. It focuses notably on changes that had wider historical importance than the internal evolution of the Roman Catholic Church as a religious organisation: war and peace, nationalism and democratisation in Africa, liberation theology, military dictatorships, guerrilla movements in Latin America, Africa and Philippines, interaction with communist governments, inculturation and relations with resurgent Islam. It views the Catholic Church as a unique example of a religious organisation responding in a unique way to globalisation. Most unusually it adopts a perspective from the global 'South' pointing to the future axis of Catholicism in the 21st. century. The book weaves together the interaction of ideas and action, doctrine and life, in an innovative and interdisciplinary way. 4.7 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Global Catholicism: Diversity and Change Since Vatican II

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Religion & Spirituality
Format Paperback
Pages 320
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication February 2009
ISBN 978-1850659563
Publisher C Hurst & Co
 

Ian Linden has been an active lay member of the Catholic Church for many years and has witnessed firsthand such important movements as liberation theology. In this book, he charts the complex history of the forces of renewal unleashed by the Second Vatican Council and the counter-forces that gathered during the last half century. It focuses notably on changes that had wider historical importance than the internal evolution of the Roman Catholic Church as a religious organisation: war and peace, nationalism and democratisation in Africa, liberation theology, military dictatorships, guerrilla movements in Latin America, Africa and Philippines, interaction with communist governments, inculturation and relations with resurgent Islam. It views the Catholic Church as a unique example of a religious organisation responding in a unique way to globalisation. Most unusually it adopts a perspective from the global 'South' pointing to the future axis of Catholicism in the 21st. century. The book weaves together the interaction of ideas and action, doctrine and life, in an innovative and interdisciplinary way.

Reviews

The Tablet

Peter Cornwell

Every bishop and priest in the Catholic Church should sit down and read this remarkable book. Ian Linden has quietly demolished canards levelled against those who believe that the reforming work of the Second Vatican Council is not yet complete. Instead of imagining that life beyond the Council is ever upwards and onwards, he takes as seriously as Pope Benedict the ever-lurking reality of sin.

08/04/2009

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Times Literary Supplement

Rupert Shortt

Admirable... In short, Linden subverts easy answers to the big questions he poses. His discussion is consistently fair-minded. Typically, a reasoned, pro-Vatican thesis will lead within a few pages to an equally compelling antithesis – in this case that Benedict XVI and his twentieth-century predecessors have been unduly reluctant to delegate power.

08/04/2009

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The Independent

Peter Stanford

Enjoyable and informative... Too often, histories of Catholicism consist of lives of popes, or polemics on headline-grabbing issues like sexuality and gender. This book has an entirely different perspective – global, political and filled with many more brave and inspiring men and women of God than it is with clerical ghouls. It is not an out-and-out celebration, but the lasting impression Linden leaves is of a hidden and positive side of the Church...

10/04/2009

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