Confucius From the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today's World

Yu Dan

Confucius From the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today's World

Simply written, and with a view to taking the wisdom of Confucius out of the hands of the academics and the philosophers and making it accessible to the general reader, "Confucius From the Heart" gives us a contemporary Confucius, one who can teach us how to attain spiritual happiness, adjust our daily routines and find our place in modern life. Yu Dan argues that his sayings, or Analects - far from being merely interesting quotes from ancient lore, of little use in our hectic, stress-filled world. Instead, they are simple truths that can speak to each and every one of us and help us lead better, happier, calmer lives. 2.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Confucius From the Heart: Ancient Wisdom for Today's World

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy, Religion & Spirituality
Format Hardback
Pages 192
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication May 2009
ISBN 978-0330464536
Publisher Macmillan
 

Simply written, and with a view to taking the wisdom of Confucius out of the hands of the academics and the philosophers and making it accessible to the general reader, "Confucius From the Heart" gives us a contemporary Confucius, one who can teach us how to attain spiritual happiness, adjust our daily routines and find our place in modern life. Yu Dan argues that his sayings, or Analects - far from being merely interesting quotes from ancient lore, of little use in our hectic, stress-filled world. Instead, they are simple truths that can speak to each and every one of us and help us lead better, happier, calmer lives.

John Crace's Digested Read (The Guardian)

Reviews

The Observer

Sun Shuyun

Yu Dan is a professor of film and television studies, and her book started as a series of lectures on Chinese Central Television. Her brief was to make her talks suitable for 15-year-olds and it shows. In this rather flat translation, and deprived of the body language that made her such a lively broadcaster (she was called the "beauty scholar"), she comes across as an agony aunt, not the transmitter of a great tradition. And her prose can be breathtakingly banal.

17/05/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore