The Templars: History and Myth

Michael Haag

The Templars: History and Myth

This is the first history of the Templars since the Vatican published its sensational records, clearing them of heresy. It investigates the Templars' history, legends and mysteries - and the belief that their hand can be seen in everything from the Cathar heresy to Masonic conspiracies. And it illuminates the background to what is believed to be the setting of Dan Brown's new novel for 2008.An order of warrior monks founded after the First Crusade to protect pilgrims to Jerusalem, the Templars developed into one of the wealthiest and most powerful bodies in the medieval world. Yet two centuries later, the Knights were suddenly arrested and accused of blasphemy, heresy and orgies, their order was abolished, and their leaders burnt at the stake. Their dramatic end shocked their contemporaries and has gripped peoples' imaginations ever since.This new book explains the whole context of Templar history, including, for the first time, the new evidence discovered by the Vatican that the Templars were not guilty of heresy. It covers the whole swathe of Templar history, from its origins in the mysteries of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem through to the nineteenth century development of the Freemasons.The book also features a guide to Templar castles and sites, and coverage of the Templars in books, movies and popular culture, from Indiana Jones to the Xbox360 game Assassin's Creed. 3.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
The Templars: History and Myth

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre History, Religion & Spirituality
Format Hardback
Pages 368
RRP £15.00
Date of Publication July 2008
ISBN 978-1846681486
Publisher Profile
 

This is the first history of the Templars since the Vatican published its sensational records, clearing them of heresy. It investigates the Templars' history, legends and mysteries - and the belief that their hand can be seen in everything from the Cathar heresy to Masonic conspiracies. And it illuminates the background to what is believed to be the setting of Dan Brown's new novel for 2008.An order of warrior monks founded after the First Crusade to protect pilgrims to Jerusalem, the Templars developed into one of the wealthiest and most powerful bodies in the medieval world. Yet two centuries later, the Knights were suddenly arrested and accused of blasphemy, heresy and orgies, their order was abolished, and their leaders burnt at the stake. Their dramatic end shocked their contemporaries and has gripped peoples' imaginations ever since.This new book explains the whole context of Templar history, including, for the first time, the new evidence discovered by the Vatican that the Templars were not guilty of heresy. It covers the whole swathe of Templar history, from its origins in the mysteries of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem through to the nineteenth century development of the Freemasons.The book also features a guide to Templar castles and sites, and coverage of the Templars in books, movies and popular culture, from Indiana Jones to the Xbox360 game Assassin's Creed.

Reviews

The Scotsman

Michael Pye

[Haag has] already written the Rough Guide to the Da Vinci Code so you can tell he's not self-conscious or terribly academic, which is good and bad. He mentions many things, which is good, from solid history to the flakiest movies, from newly-found documents to the notion that somehow Templars started the French Revolution and still run the Skull and Bones club at Yale (and maybe George W Bush). But, inevitably, the material is thin – you could make half a library out of Templar lore – and the Templars deserve better.

15/04/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

Christopher Howse

Michael Haag, in his well-knit narrative, gets through an enormous spread of history, helpfully telling readers what the Bible has to say about the Jewish Temple before running through the Roman, Muslim and Crusader centuries. The after-history of the Templars is dominated by the imaginings of Freemasons and the conspiracy fancies of scarcely distinct alternative historians and novelists. If anything, the author is too tolerant of this froth. Historical truth does matter.

26/07/2008

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