Brian Clough: The Biography: Nobody Ever Says Thank You

Jonathan Wilson

Brian Clough: The Biography: Nobody Ever Says Thank You

I was asked in an interview to sum up Brian in three words. I think he would be insulted to be summed up in three volumes.' Martin O'Neill had a point. Brian Howard Clough was never less than a complex man; the sum of a contradictory bunch of impulses, desires and drives. Jonathan Wilson, in this first full, critical biography paints a portrait of one of England's greatest football managers, and his right-hand man, Peter Taylor, and reveals how their identities were forged in the unforgiving world of post-war football, a world where, as Clough and Taylor's mentor Harry Storer once said, 'Nobody ever says thank you.' 4.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Brian Clough: The Biography: Nobody Ever Says Thank You

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, Sports, Hobbies & Games
Format Hardback
Pages 576
RRP £20.00
Date of Publication November 2011
ISBN 978-1409123170
Publisher Orion
 

I was asked in an interview to sum up Brian in three words. I think he would be insulted to be summed up in three volumes.' Martin O'Neill had a point. Brian Howard Clough was never less than a complex man; the sum of a contradictory bunch of impulses, desires and drives. Jonathan Wilson, in this first full, critical biography paints a portrait of one of England's greatest football managers, and his right-hand man, Peter Taylor, and reveals how their identities were forged in the unforgiving world of post-war football, a world where, as Clough and Taylor's mentor Harry Storer once said, 'Nobody ever says thank you.'

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Simon Redfern

There are no explosive revelations but he does nail the myth that Clough was not a tactician, and highlights his capacity for spontaneous acts of great kindness. He also reminds us how astonishing Clough's achievements at Derby County and Nottingham Forest were ... It is the definitive factual account, yet after 550 pages the real Clough remains curiously elusive, still an enigma. But what an enigma.

01/01/2012

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The Observer

Barney Ronay

Absorbing and sure-footed ... This is an attempt to tell the story, for once, without the volume tuned up to 11 and with the stopper still firmly lodged in the whisky jar ... [Wilson gives us] a methodical, non-hysterical, beautifully detailed Clough; a perfectly crafted mixer to go with the heady, emotive, intoxicated Clough‑ernalia of recent years.

11/12/2011

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The Sunday Times

Rod Liddle

Meticulously researched … Wilson is a little sanctimonious at times, and in a sense this is an anti-Clough book: heavy on detail, a little short on flair. But it is the most comprehensive account we have had of this remarkable man so far.

13/11/2011

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