Antarctica

Gabrielle Walker

Antarctica

There have been many books about Antarctica in the past, but all have focused on only one aspect of the continent - its science, its wildlife, the heroic age of exploration, personal experiences or the sheer awesome beauty of the landscape, for example - but none has managed to capture whole story, till now. Gabrielle Walker, author, consultant to New Scientist and regular broadcaster with the BBC has written a book unlike any that has ever been written about the continent. Antarctica weaves all the significant threads into an intricate tapestry, made up of science, natural history, poetry, epic history, what it feels like to be there and why it draws so many different kinds of people back there again and again. It is only when all the parts come together that the underlying truths of the continent emerge. Antarctica is the most alien place on Earth, the only part of our planet where humans could never survive unaided. It is truly like walking on another planet. And yet, in its silence, its agelessness and its mysteries lie the secrets of our past, and of our future. 3.3 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Antarctica

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Travel, Science & Nature
Format Hardback
Pages 416
RRP £20.00
Date of Publication March 2012
ISBN 978-1408811108
Publisher Bloomsbury
 

There have been many books about Antarctica in the past, but all have focused on only one aspect of the continent - its science, its wildlife, the heroic age of exploration, personal experiences or the sheer awesome beauty of the landscape, for example - but none has managed to capture whole story, till now. Gabrielle Walker, author, consultant to New Scientist and regular broadcaster with the BBC has written a book unlike any that has ever been written about the continent. Antarctica weaves all the significant threads into an intricate tapestry, made up of science, natural history, poetry, epic history, what it feels like to be there and why it draws so many different kinds of people back there again and again. It is only when all the parts come together that the underlying truths of the continent emerge. Antarctica is the most alien place on Earth, the only part of our planet where humans could never survive unaided. It is truly like walking on another planet. And yet, in its silence, its agelessness and its mysteries lie the secrets of our past, and of our future.

Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Forbes

Gabrielle Walker's book comprehensively brings us up to date on the continent that is so much more than ice and seasonal penguins. Walker is a former staff writer on Nature magazine: she has read all the science and for this book has made many visits to Antarctica and absorbed the culture of the bases. Besides giving a vivid portrait of what it is like to live with -60C temperatures and six months of darkness, she unobtrusively recounts the stories of great explorers of around 100 years ago...

17/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Spectator

Sara Wheeler

Hugely informative … She has a gift for lay analogy, as a popular science writer must … Walker’s attempts to illuminate non-scientific aspects of the Great White South are less successful.

10/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Telegraph

Ed O'Loughlin

Apparently aiming for the widest possible readership, Walker employs a bubbly, populist, mid-Atlantic narrative style which can veer towards the lightweight. All too often, she professes to be mind-blown by some new discovery or factoid, like a polar Gok Wan or Dawn Porter ... This is a pity, because when she finds the right focus — as she does, for instance, in describing the bleak polar plateau — Walker can write very nicely

15/03/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore