DarkMarket: Cybercrime, Cybercops and You

Misha Glenny

DarkMarket: Cybercrime, Cybercops and You

The benefits of living in a digital, globalised society are enormous; so too are the dangers. The world has become a law enforcer's nightmare and every criminal's dream. We bank online, shop online, date, learn, work and live online. But have the institutions that keep us safe on the streets learned to protect us in the burgeoning digital world? Have we become complacent about our personal security — sharing our thoughts, beliefs and the details of our daily lives with anyone who cares to relieve us of them? In this book, Misha Glenny explores the three fundamental threats facing us in the 21st century: cyber crime, cyber warfare and cyber industrial espionage. 3.2 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
DarkMarket: Cybercrime, Cybercops and You

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Technology, True Crime
Format Hardback
Pages 304
RRP £20.00
Date of Publication September 2011
ISBN 978-1847921260
Publisher Bodley Head
 

The benefits of living in a digital, globalised society are enormous; so too are the dangers. The world has become a law enforcer's nightmare and every criminal's dream. We bank online, shop online, date, learn, work and live online. But have the institutions that keep us safe on the streets learned to protect us in the burgeoning digital world? Have we become complacent about our personal security — sharing our thoughts, beliefs and the details of our daily lives with anyone who cares to relieve us of them? In this book, Misha Glenny explores the three fundamental threats facing us in the 21st century: cyber crime, cyber warfare and cyber industrial espionage.

Reviews

The Sunday Times

John Kampfner

This is a gripping tale, brilliantly researched. But I’m perplexed by one story, Stuxnet, “to date the world’s most sophisticated virus”. When Stuxnet was successfully planted in the control system of several nuclear facilities in Iran, the authorities admitted that it led to a significant breakdown in the operation of a highly sensitive station. “It could have resulted in an explosion. Its existence proves that the doomsday scenarios proposed by the so-called cyberwarriors are no longer only theoretically possible.” Yet Glenny does not state, or even surmise, who might have infiltrated it. The Americans? Israelis? If true, this is a potentially extremely important story, yet it is thrown away in a page or two.

04/09/2011

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The Financial Times

John Lloyd

Since he has had to teach himself their codes, protocols and affectations, he is good at teaching us and does so without condescension ... He likes detail, and sometimes it overwhelms; here, as in McMafia, it can lead to much retracing of steps to get the narrative straight. But he has succeeded in illuminating much that was hidden. This is an early, at times magnificent pass at a new world, which will grow greatly as our lives become ever more entangled with the web.

30/09/2011

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The Wall Street Journal

Evgeny Morozov

... an eminently readable, witty narrative that sustains suspense until the very last pages. It also provides a remarkable example of how the "micro-history" of the Internet — as opposed to the "macro-history" peddled by Internet pundits who see monumental social shifts in a handful of dubious anecdotes — should be written.

01/10/2011

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The Sunday Telegraph

Ed Lake

He seems to have spoken to everyone. His sympathies are with the police and he has special contempt for the banks, who charge the costs of their own lax security back to their customers. As for the hackers themselves, Glenny seems torn between condemnation and understanding.

29/09/2011

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The Independent

Ross Anderson

What Glenny adds is the human colour ... This book has a major weakness, though. Many of the descriptions of the technology are wrong, some painfully so, and while Glenny uses our jargon, he uses it so badly that it's a constant irritant … The publishers were negligent in not having it proofread by a technically literate editor.

30/09/2011

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The Literary Review

John Sweeney

The cover is excitingly decorated with a skull and crossed scimitars over a fancy credit card, promising a piratical read, a modern update of Moonfleet or Kidnapped. But instead of Blind Pew and Long John Silver you end up reading about geeky tossers who call themselves Lord Cyric, Cha0, JiLsi and GombeenMan ... They pop up in electronic databases and court cases, flash their tails at the reader and then vanish again. Glenny does not get narrative traction on them. To be fair, this is a task akin to nailing will-o’-the-wisps to the wall, but it makes for a choppy and unsatisfactory read.

01/09/2011

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