Intruders

Intruders

Intruders tells parallel stories of two families whose lives are disrupted by menacing apparitions: in Spain, a mother tries to protect her son from a faceless stranger, while in Britain, a young girl has terrifying dreams of a demon who becomes a real danger to her and her family. 2.0 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
Intruders

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Horror, Thriller
Director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo
Cast Daniel Bruhl, Carice van Houten, Kerry Fox, Pilar López de Ayala Clive Owen
Studio Universal Pictures
Release Date January 2012
Running Time 100 mins
 

Intruders tells parallel stories of two families whose lives are disrupted by menacing apparitions: in Spain, a mother tries to protect her son from a faceless stranger, while in Britain, a young girl has terrifying dreams of a demon who becomes a real danger to her and her family.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

As ever in Spanish horror, the genre is just a smokescreen to conceal a thoughtful and sensitive meditation on a country still smarting from the aftershocks of civil war and a dictatorship that suffocated it for 40 years ... deep down it is about buried secrets and, rather like Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone, the way the skeleton in the closet sometimes just won’t stay put.

23/01/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

Hasn't the power of something like The Others.

27/01/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Really very humdrum stuff.

26/01/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Intruders taps into primal fears of both parents and children, but its impact is somewhat muffled by the wavering between these two poles.

27/01/2012

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Scotland on Sunday

Siobhan Synnot

Early atmospheric chills eventually give way to an exasperating plot twist.

22/01/2012

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Time Out

Nigel Floyd

Fresnadillo cannot make up his mind whether he wants this to be a multiplex-friendly horror movie focused on a hooded monster named Hollow Face or a more subtle emotional fable about two children whose made-up stories and darkest fears conjure up and feed a faceless killer.

23/01/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

The twist is that the two stories are not concurrent, though in the end this doesn't make the film more coherent or plausible.

29/01/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

The film’s style inclines more to the Hispanic side of things, being a slightly cruder version of the shadowy fairy-tale horror associated with Guillermo del Toro.

29/01/2012

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The Times

Kevin Maher

Nearly 100 agonising minutes of scare-free inanity, it reveals that both stories are, in fact — lucky us — connected! And therefore?

27/01/2012

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