The Myth of the American Sleepover

The Myth of the American Sleepover

It's the last night of summer and Maggie, Rob, Claudia, Scott and Beth are looking for love and adventure. As they explore the suburban wonderland they inhabit their paths cross and intersect with the lives of the other teenagers in their town. The teenagers in Mitchell's world may be lost and a little confused, but ultimately they come to deeper realisations about the search for human connections. 3.3 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
The Myth of the American Sleepover

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama, Comedy
Director David Robert Mitchell
Cast Brett Jacobsen, Claire Sloma, Douglas Diedrich, Marlon Morton, Wyatt McCallum, Amanda Bauer
Studio Independent Films
Release Date August 2012
Running Time 96 mins
 

It's the last night of summer and Maggie, Rob, Claudia, Scott and Beth are looking for love and adventure. As they explore the suburban wonderland they inhabit their paths cross and intersect with the lives of the other teenagers in their town. The teenagers in Mitchell's world may be lost and a little confused, but ultimately they come to deeper realisations about the search for human connections.

Reviews

The Los Angeles Times

Kevin Thomas

First-time writer-director David Robert Mitchell tells a coming-of-age tale with such freshness and such bemused insight it's as if it has never been told before.

29/07/2011

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

The relationships go off at strange tangents ... No one will be surprised that the film discredits its own title, arguing not for adolescence to be regarded as a swizz but for the cherishing of those juvenile summers when we clumsily forge our future selves like fumbling amateur blacksmiths.

30/08/2012

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

What Mr. Mitchell gets splendidly right in this quiet, observant film, is the unsteady mixture of sophistication and naïveté that is central to the modern American teenage way of being in the world. These children — the oldest character is home from college, and there is not a parent in sight — hardly know what, or who, they are supposed to want, but yearning seems to be both their birthright and their responsibility.

21/07/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

None of the sweetly troubled love plots quite heals or seals itself, an uncertainty made incandescent by the unknown cast, the soundtrack’s rueful songs and James Laxton’s superb photography, which puts the elegiac lyricism into this midsummer night’s love tragicomedy.

30/08/2012

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The Guardian

Henry Barnes

Presumably not all kids are roaming as wildly as Larry Clark's little heathens, but this film's reverence to three little words ("I like you") is chastity-band creepy.

30/08/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

This is a night of sidelong glances, wistful gazes, a few beers and a tender kiss here and there; these teenagers are more watchful, more chaste, almost more respectful, than Hollywood's amped-up version of the breed. Perhaps a little more drama wouldn't have gone amiss, but then eventlessness is part of its purpose. This is teenage as an American Truffaut would see it, with a woozy charm reminiscent of Sofia Coppola's The Virgin Suicides.

31/08/2012

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Empire Magazine

Angie Errigo

The protagonists are amateur, but their occasional awkwardness only accentuates Mitchell’s whole point: these are confused, awkward, semi-adults who are not perfectly polished, or capable of delivering perfect lines.

28/08/2012

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

You will see the words “honest”, “original” and “tender” applied to David Robert Mitchell’s debut. Sorry to spoil the party, but “contrived”, “implausible” and “goddam irritating” are closer to the mark.

31/08/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Marc Lee

A likeable cast of unknowns wriggle convincingly through the awkwardness of late adolescence.

31/08/2012

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

There’s a lot to like here – not least disarmingly natural performances from the mostly non-professional actors.

29/08/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

The pace of the film is such that you actually feel that teen inertia, time sliding to a halt, punctuated by great blasts of indie pop. Written and directed by first-timer David Robert Mitchell, the film has a certain sub-Lynchian style: the light is almost black in a supermarket where love kindles; there are strange cutaways to garden sprinklers and ornaments; and the sheer, dull banality of a pyjama party grinds into the screen.

31/08/2012

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Total Film

Ellen E. Jones

Like Linklater’s film, the story wanders from stilted conversation to skinny dip, but unlike Linklater’s film, it doesn’t feature any memorable characters. If the teens are occasionally dull to watch, their awkwardness is always authentic.

20/08/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

t's an unsentimental debut of some promise and it has the ring of truth.

02/09/2012

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The Sunday Times

Jonathan Dean

There’s little new in this wistful indie movie, but the debuting director, David Robert Mitchell, has a knack for highlighting how much teenagers say to each other by not really saying anything at all.

02/09/2012

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