Dredd

Dredd

The future America is an irradiated waste land. On its East Coast, running from Boston to Washington DC, lies Mega City One- a vast, violent metropolis where criminals rule the chaotic streets. The only force of order lies with the urban cops called “Judges” who possess the combined powers of judge, jury and instant executioner. Known and feared throughout the city, Dredd is the ultimate Judge, challenged with ridding the city of its latest scourge – a dangerous drug epidemic that has users of “Slo-Mo” experiencing reality at a fraction of its normal speed. 3.2 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
Dredd

Omniscore:

Certificate 18
Genre Action, Science Fiction, Thriller
Director Pete Travis
Cast Karl Urban, Olivia Thirlby, Lena Headey
Studio Entertainment UK
Release Date September 2012
Running Time 95 mins
 

The future America is an irradiated waste land. On its East Coast, running from Boston to Washington DC, lies Mega City One- a vast, violent metropolis where criminals rule the chaotic streets. The only force of order lies with the urban cops called “Judges” who possess the combined powers of judge, jury and instant executioner. Known and feared throughout the city, Dredd is the ultimate Judge, challenged with ridding the city of its latest scourge – a dangerous drug epidemic that has users of “Slo-Mo” experiencing reality at a fraction of its normal speed.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

It’s the 3D visuals that really make you gulp. Cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle creates hyper-real textures, mostly close-ups of liquids and skin, that defy belief. Imagine medieval tapestries, American pop art and Disney ice forests melting, helter skelter, into one... Such sequences are especially unsettling when used to show the delicious effects of Slo-Mo. While a part of us is drawn to Dredd’s puritannical zeal, another part of us longs to go with the decadent, swooning flow. The film is about law vs chaos. Via its images, it manages to take both sides.

07/08/2012

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The Financial Times

Antonia Quirke

Although the three leads are unimprovable, the great pivotal decision was to have Dredd himself played by a normal human being. He may be based on a character from a comic strip, but if you allow Dredd to be more Dirty Harry than Terminator then everything else slots into place. Make him a muscle-bound, cartoonish Vin Diesel or even Chris Hemsworth and then it follows that his motorbike must be huge and the guns must be even more huge, along with the explosions and everything else: it messes badly with the sense of scale.

06/09/2012

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The Guardian

Phelim O'Neill

The essence of Dredd is that he is almost an anti-character – he doesn't change or learn – and Urban nails it in an ego-free performance with half his head obscured by a helmet.

06/09/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Particularly useful ... is Headey’s full-on performance as Ma-Ma. At a time when the kind of ass-kicking, perfectly made-up robo-babe that Kate Beckinsale usually plays is Hollywood’s idea of a strong female character in genre cinema, the Game of Thrones star’s menacing, unhinged, vanity-free performance makes her stand out even more. She’s a great comic-book movie villainess and she further helps the film feel like one of the more resilient and focused comic-book adaptations of late.

05/09/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Tim Walker

Dredd is silly, derivative, and sometimes the budget cracks are visible in the CGI, but it's considerably more enjoyable than anyone had a right to expect.

09/09/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Travis and his team have done a sound job. The film is tough and laconic, in the manner of a good John Carpenter movie, and its star, Karl Urban, is excellent, growling like Clint Eastwood and — true to the comic — never removing his face-obscuring helmet.

09/09/2012

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Empire Magazine

Chris Hewitt

Dredd’s director, Pete Travis, and screenwriter Alex Garland ... transplant Dredd straight from the comics onto the screen. This Dredd is a deadpan delight - he doesn’t grow as a person and he doesn’t crack wise. In fact, the movie generates its few laughs from his sheer intractability – a grunt here, a monosyllabic response there. It’s a role that has to be handled with care, and luckily Urban is excellent. Unlike Stallone, the helmet stays on and, without recourse to his eyes, Urban is forced to give good lower head, leading with the manliest movie chin this side of Kirk Douglas, and growling his lines in an Eastwood-meets-Pazuzu rasp that just about manages to stay the right side of tough-guy parody.

04/09/2012

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

The film has clearly been made on a tighter budget than your average Hollywood shoot-’em-up, but Travis makes the most of limited resources: the industrial backdrops are stunning, the action scenes sizzle and the eye-of-the-addict Slo-Mo sequences are sickeningly beautiful. A shame, then, that the script consistently falls so flat.

05/09/2012

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Total Film

Jonathan Crocker

If it’s cheese, it’s hard cheese. Stomping forward like an old-school Verhoeven movie, Dredd keeps you hooked with blunt charisma and some deadpan mega-violence. Bullets split faces, brains spill like dropped porridge and, at one point, Urban flattens a man’s windpipe with his fist. Oof.

05/09/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

Dredd talks like Clint Eastwood with laryngitis, and the part of the face not concealed by his mask looks like Sly Stallone. Inferior to the similar Indonesian The Raid, but a great night out for unfastidious, unsqueamish loners.

09/09/2012

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The Times

Kevin Maher

On the positive side, there are serious ideas in here about the nature of cinematic violence — the film boasts breathtaking slow-motion sequences, courtesy of Oscar-winning cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle, that depict exploding faces, blood splattered exit wounds, and disintegrating skulls. However, Travis’s action direction is mostly pitiful, the video-game narrative structure is limiting and, worst of all, the central character, Dredd himself, is fatally uninteresting.

07/09/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Cue corridor-chases, gun battles and the sort of ultra slo-mo that examines precisely how flesh is lacerated by bullets. N ice. Dredd has pretty much everything your violent action adventure could hope for – except timing.

07/08/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Interestingly, the comic books have, over the years, questioned Judge Dredd’s fascist approach to law enforcement, and even satirised it. But screenwriter Alex Garland can’t be bothered to express any doubts and goes back to basics: Dredd is a great guy, performing his civic duty of kicking ass and blowing people apart.

07/09/2012

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