One Day

One Day

I can imagine you at forty,' she said, a hint of malice in her voice. 'I can picture it right now.' He smiled without opening his eyes. 'Go on then.' 15th July 1988. Emma and Dexter meet for the first time on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways. So where will they be on this one day next year? And the year after that? And every year that follows? Twenty years, two people, ONE DAY. 2.8 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
One Day

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama, Romance
Director Lone Scherfig
Cast Patricia Clarkson, Anne Hathaway, Romola Garai, Rafe Spall Jim Sturgess
Studio Universal Pictures
Release Date August 2011
Running Time 108 mins
 

I can imagine you at forty,' she said, a hint of malice in her voice. 'I can picture it right now.' He smiled without opening his eyes. 'Go on then.' 15th July 1988. Emma and Dexter meet for the first time on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways. So where will they be on this one day next year? And the year after that? And every year that follows? Twenty years, two people, ONE DAY.

Read The Omnivore's roundup for ONE DAY by David Nicholls.

Reviews

The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Her [Lone Scherfig's] eccentric eye and offbeat rhythm sustain One Day through its stretches of banality and mitigate some of its flaws. Among these are a superficial sense of history — remember how girls used to wear their hair? remember nuclear disarmament? — and, more seriously, a late, disastrous dive into the deep end of weepitude.

18/08/2011

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

The film doesn’t ring true to life the way the novel does; it rings true to a film version of life. We’re always on the outside, looking in at the lives of Dexter and Emma — and not under their skin and in their shoes. Nicholls created literary characters who were familiar and fresh, made of flesh and blood ... One Day is not the wonderful weepie we fans of the book were hoping for. But it’s not a bad film, either. Block all the details of the book’s characters out of your mind, go with what’s on offer, and you still have an appealing, often funny story, enjoyably acted, that we can all relate to ...

21/08/2011

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Total Film

Emma Dibdin

One Day isn’t a story about big moments – it’s about the almost-moments, the near misses, the wasted years. But the same-day-each-year device falters on screen, because there’s so little time to establish what’s changed in each new timeframe.

17/08/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

My colleagues take the novel’s Balzacian listing of period items and icons as the stuff of masterly writing. But Balzac attached tales and characters; Nicholls just gives laundry lists, with a few jokes and a love story. In what way is Hathaway unworthy of that? Both she and Sturgess, a puppyish charmer with a real light comedy flair, are better than their material.

25/08/2011

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The Independent

Geoffrey MacNab

... a romcom that goes beyond genre conventions but still delivers. It is episodic, wildly uneven, and prone to mawkishness. Nonetheless, this is ultimately an effective weepie that shouldn't disappoint the devotees of the book.

26/08/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Sukhdev Sandhu

The bigger flaw is that neither she nor Dex is able to draw us into their fears, feelings, raptures. Or to suggest that they’re even capable of real emotions. Their hairstyles and outfits change, but they themselves evolve very little. Often, the settings are more charismatic than the leads.

25/08/2011

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

The result is a compromise – but not a disastrous one. Nicholls’ script follows his novel closely as a ‘greatest hits’ spin on the book, rather than taking it anywhere new ... but it still has an undeniable emotional wallop by its close.

24/08/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

What’s lacking is the strong sense of time and place that was so evocative in An Education. Obviously the structure — a snapshot of the lives of Emma and Dexter on the same day, July 15, every year from 1988 until 2008 — means that it is rather harder to immerse the audience in the period. But still, there is something a little insular about the film that doesn’t even acknowledge the seismic change in London and Londoners in the aftermath of the 7/7 bombings when part of the story takes place just a week after those attacks.

26/08/2011

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Time Magazine

Mary Pols

Even in the skillful hands of director Lone Scherfig (An Education, Italian for Beginners), the effect is disjointed. The characters that Nicholls brought so cunningly to life in the book feel rushed through a timeline, tied to an agenda ... It's beyond strange that the primary fault of One Day lies with the screenplay. Nicholls is not inexperienced; he did a nice job adapting his novel Starter for Ten for the movies. How could he — having provided such vivid snapshots not just of Dex and Em's lives but of the culture and world around them on these many July 15s — write such a hazy movie?

18/08/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A slushy, mawkish and weirdly humourless romance with a sub-Richard Curtis style and more endings than Lord of the Rings. The big emotional climax is unearned and the all-important high concept is now a bit blurred.

24/10/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsy Sharkey

In the film, there is a lot of tempting and resisting and a few lingering kisses, beautifully shot by director of photography Benoit Delhomme, but the passion is missing. If anything, the awkwardness that rightfully infuses their first encounter never leaves.

19/08/2011

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