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Aliena wakes up in a river in France with a bag with 2 million euros, a scar across her abdomen and no memory. She seeks refuge in the nearest town but soon discovers that mysterious men are following her. With the help of the French hotelier Pierre she temporarily gets away from the pursuers ... Slowly traces begin to appear about the past.Aliena is still being pursued and she gradually learns that her past life was more complicated than she first thought. 2.2 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
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Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Thriller
Director Christian E. Christiansen
Cast Flemming Enevold, Carsten Bjørnlund Tuva Novotny
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date February 2012
Running Time 104 mins
 

Aliena wakes up in a river in France with a bag with 2 million euros, a scar across her abdomen and no memory. She seeks refuge in the nearest town but soon discovers that mysterious men are following her. With the help of the French hotelier Pierre she temporarily gets away from the pursuers ... Slowly traces begin to appear about the past.Aliena is still being pursued and she gradually learns that her past life was more complicated than she first thought.

Reviews

Time Out

Anna Smith

A stylish Danish thriller that’s more than serviceable for fans of the genre, if not up there with recent Scandinavian hits such as ‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ or TV’s ‘The Killing’.

14/02/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

Some agreeable suspense, a great deal of violence, some rather vague leftwing politics and some narrative holes.

19/02/2012

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

The sort of thriller that pays closer attention to its heroine’s hair than to her inner turmoil.

06/02/2012

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The Times

Kevin Maher

There are guilty pleasures to be enjoyed here, not least the world’s longest mid-strangulation flashback sequence.

17/02/2012

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

File under BOR:ING.

17/02/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A lot of the film's action is presented in a long flashback as it suddenly comes back to her what on earth has been going on, and this single, undigested chunk of remembered action robs us of the pleasure of uncovering the truth bit by bit.

16/02/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Christiansen treats the obstacles of credibility like a getaway driver scattering a police roadblock.

17/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

The film’s dull progress erodes your curiosity; and when the big revelation finally comes, it’s a long, convoluted flashback of ever-increasing silliness.

19/02/2012

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