Master Class

Terrence McNally

Master Class

An extraordinary insight into the life and loves of Maria Callas, the iconic opera singer whose turbulent private life and fiery temperament were as astonishing as her formidable talents. Inspired by her master classes of the early 70s, this is a riveting, hilarious and intensely moving portrayal of the sacrifice and heartache behind the artist, the diva and the legend. 3.1 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
Master Class

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Vaudeville Theatre
Director Stephen Wadsworth
Cast Gerard Carey, Jeremy Cohen, Naomi O'Connell, Dianne Pilkington, Garrett Sorenson Tyne Daly
From February 2012
Until April 2012
Box Office 0844 811 0059
 

An extraordinary insight into the life and loves of Maria Callas, the iconic opera singer whose turbulent private life and fiery temperament were as astonishing as her formidable talents. Inspired by her master classes of the early 70s, this is a riveting, hilarious and intensely moving portrayal of the sacrifice and heartache behind the artist, the diva and the legend.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

Full of little interactions with the audience and moments we're expected to answer with applause, Master Class is the most knowing, bombastic kind of Broadway show. But, crucially, Stephen Wadsworth's production gives Daly room to captivate, and she consistently does just that.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

This may be a flawed and even dishonest play, but it is a highly entertaining one, and Tyne Daly richly deserves her standing ovation.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Times

Libby Purves

The first act relishes caricature: Callas veering between wonderful artistic statements about truth in acting and self-aggrandising riffs about how she walked to the Athens Conservatoire with bleeding feet and gave up oranges to buy pencils for taking notes ... Caricature can grow stale, however entertaining, but jolts of real operatic passion surface whenever the music carries Callas through fictional emotion into real remembered griefs.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Observer

Kate Kellaway

One has to hope, though, that this portrait, focusing on the end of the soprano's career, is unfair ... It is only because Daly is so accomplished that we see vulnerability in this monster – and like her anyway.

12/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

David Jays

At its best during the coaching scenes, where Callas keeps students in a nicely simmering state of terror, and weaves in catty put-downs and overwrought flashbacks.

12/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Ian Shuttleworth

Callas is certainly a compelling figure ... but in the event any diminution towards merely human stature is dramatically crippling.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Stage

Mark Shenton

Creating great art, or being a conduit for it, comes at a price. The irony of McNally’s play about the pain and cost of doing so is that the playwright has not created any himself, but this efficient, effective star vehicle nevertheless articulates the personal losses associated with that pursuit with a moving and intense clarity.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Michael Billington

Against the odds, Daly gives the evening the touch of class that McNally's script lacks. Imperious in a black trouser suit, she hints that Callas's casual cruelty to the students is somehow a product of her own damaged soul ... But, in the end, this is a show about opera for those who hate opera. I only wish we could have seen Daly's famous performance as Rose in Sondheim's Gypsy, which must have been a match for her formidable talents.

07/02/2012

Read Full Review


The Independent

Paul Taylor

It is the debased, cliche-ridden version of Callas, served up here, that drags it down to that level. The character has as much in common with Dame Edna as with the great artist which this "event" or "entertainment" (you couldn't call it an even half-way decent play) travesties.

08/02/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore