The Recruiting Officer

George Farquar

The Recruiting Officer

It’s with the promise of money, glory and adventure that Captain Plume is recruiting the men of Shrewsbury for the King’s army. He’s also determined to make a conquest of Sylvia, but as she’s now an heiress she can afford to put him to the test. All the while, the scheming Melinda is toying with the affections of Captain Brazen and the gentleman Mr Worthy. 4.1 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
The Recruiting Officer

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Donmar Warehouse
Director Josie Rourke
Cast Nancy Carroll, Mackenzie Crook, Kathryn Drysdale, Aimee-Ffion Edwards, Mark Gatiss, Tobias Menzies, Rachael Stirling Nicholas Burns
From February 2012
Until April 2012
Box Office 0844 871 7624
 

It’s with the promise of money, glory and adventure that Captain Plume is recruiting the men of Shrewsbury for the King’s army. He’s also determined to make a conquest of Sylvia, but as she’s now an heiress she can afford to put him to the test. All the while, the scheming Melinda is toying with the affections of Captain Brazen and the gentleman Mr Worthy.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

This is one of those rare evenings when one wants to go through almost the entire cast merrily sprinkling praise and approval. The performances are almost all blessed with freshness and revealing comic detail, even in the smallest roles, and the whole show goes with a tremendous swing.

15/02/2012

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Time Out

Caroline McGinn

Given the heavy representation of bluff military blokes in British drama, you have to salute a director who - as she showed with a phwoahsome David Tennant-led band in last summer's 'Much Ado' - enjoys making soldiers sexy. The Byronic camp spirit just swells and swells in this hugely fanciable show, where the lads are so impressed with their own chivalry that they even start snogging each other.

15/02/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

It sometimes feels too sugary a trifle.

15/02/2012

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The Daily Mail

Quentin Letts

Framing a light play so determinedly in its historical context may be a bit of a cop-out, but the visuals are handsome and the acting will steady from some of the last-preview jitters I saw.

17/02/2012

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The Observer

Susannah Clap

As the world loses its wits, the theatre reaches for wit, as it does for farce.

19/02/2012

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The Stage

Mark Shenton

The quintessential Donmar show. It looks and sounds gorgeous, it is cast to the nines, and is at once intimate yet expansive, funny and detailed.

15/02/2012

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

A fresh, spirited account of a relentlessly busy play. The dominant notes are fizzy amusement and a festive sexiness. It's an extravagant opener for the new regime at the Donmar. On this evidence, I'm recruited.

15/02/2012

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The Daily Express

Julie Carpenter

Rourke has assembled a host of comedic names ... who all deliver excellent individual performances with sufficient theatricality for the frolicking piece this is.

15/02/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

Rourke massages it until it swells, and undercuts it with a touching wistfulness. At the end, the rather fabulous band, who also play the men pressed unwillingly into service, march to their deaths to the dying strains of Over the Hills and Far Away. After all the laughter, it is a reminder that war is no joke. This is an evening that is clear-eyed, lacking in cynicism but also resolutely unsentimental.

15/02/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

Rourke proves that it is possible to register this toughness in a staging that is nonetheless irradiated with golden good humour. Its shocks are all the more effective for stealing up on you slowly -- as in the sobering finale ... It's an eloquent diminuendo to a production that beautifully balances the alfresco freshness of the piece and its often madly droll knowingness about theatrical convention.

15/02/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Kate Bassett

Hardly a slice of grim realism, in spite of a programme note professing otherwise. This is a jovial romp, with conniving wiles played for laughs.

19/02/2012

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