The Bomb: A Partial History

Nicolas Kent

The Bomb: A Partial History

A political history of the Nuclear Bomb and its proliferation from 1940 to the present day, will run concurrently with the festival. The Bomb is presented in two parts: First Blast and Second Blast. 3.7 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
The Bomb: A Partial History

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Tricycle Theatre
Director Nicolas Kent
Cast Paul Bhattacharjee, Simon Chandler, Michael Cochrane, Tariq Jordan, Shereen Martin, Daniel Rabin, Simon Rouse, Rick Warden, David Yip Nathalie Armin
From February 2012
Until April 2012
Box Office 020 7328 1000
 

A political history of the Nuclear Bomb and its proliferation from 1940 to the present day, will run concurrently with the festival. The Bomb is presented in two parts: First Blast and Second Blast.

Playwrights are: Zinnie Harris, Ron Hutchinson, Lee Blessing, Amit Gupta, John Donnelly, Colin Teevan, Diana Son, Ryan Craig, David Greig

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

A story of secrets and lies, bureaucracy and technical prowess. The thrill of scientific innovation collides with the chicanery of statecraft, while idealism is smothered by naked realities.

21/02/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

This is not so much a history of the bomb as a history of our relationship with the implications of its existence.

22/02/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

The Tricycle has once again started a debate that our politicians would prefer to suppress.

21/02/2012

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The Stage

Jeremy Austin

Can only be reviewed as an event. And what an event. Only the Tricycle could present a five-hour marathon on the development and deployment of the nuclear bomb. And only the Tricycle could make those five hours fly. Not that all the contributions work. Those that tend to be more exposition, such as Hutchinson’s Calculated Risk, tend to slow proceedings down, educating rather than entertaining.

21/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Best of all is David Greig’s superb The Letter of Last Resort, set in the near future, in which Belinda Lang as the new PM discusses those letters to the Trident captains with a senior civil servant. It is at once amusing, moving and thought-provoking, brilliantly encapsulating the paradoxes and terror of mutually assured destruction.

21/02/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

Sharply edited and constantly absorbing.

21/02/2012

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The Daily Mail

Patrick Marimon

It may sound like hard work but it’s not. In fact, it’s often very amusing. Really!

23/02/2012

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The Observer

Susannah Clapp

Interspersed with snatches of verbatim material, set against an effectively simple series of panels designed by Polly Sullivan ... these plays take us from the 1930s to the present day. From shifty early dealings to current threats and paranoia about Iran. Some are personal, some are polemical, some are satirical. They are extremely uneven.

26/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szalwinska

Heave enough playlets at an issue and some are bound to be on target. The rest can be neatly filed away under “worthy”.

26/02/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Kate Bassett

The scripts are patchy, some lumpen with background facts, others without enough. You might also expect more sense of urgency regarding North Korea and Iran's current nuclear status. Still, the plays cover a lot of ground, and with slick scene changes and much role-swapping by Paul Bhattacharjee, Belinda Lang and others, combine ethical arguments with surprising humour.

26/02/2012

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