Bingo

Edward Bond

Bingo

The glory years of London behind him, William Shakespeare finds himself in an overwhelming moral dilemma. Like his greatest creation King Lear, he has to decide: what shall he do with his money and his power? 3.2 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
Bingo

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Young Vic
Director Angus Jackson
Cast Tom Godwin, Richard McCabe, John McEnery, Patrick Stewart, Michelle Tate, Catherine Cusack
From February 2012
Until March 2012
Box Office 020 7922 2922
 

The glory years of London behind him, William Shakespeare finds himself in an overwhelming moral dilemma. Like his greatest creation King Lear, he has to decide: what shall he do with his money and his power?

Reviews

The Guardian

Michael Billington

Bond's play is a guilt-ridden indictment of all poets and dramatists, himself included, for their exploitation of suffering and cruelty. "Every writer," as Bond's Shakespeare claims, "writes in other men's blood."

24/02/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

With that beautiful bald brow and chiselled cheek, Stewart's Bard compels and tantalises because he's broodingly slippery, veering between anguish and that off-message unreachable quality.

24/02/2012

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The Stage

Michael Coveney

Truly chilling, truly poetic.

24/02/2012

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The Daily Express

Neil Norman

At a time when David Cameron is attempting to divert the rage against greedy bankers and profiteering in general, Bond’s diatribe - “What does it cost to stay alive?” - sounds as if it has been ripped from today’s headlines.

28/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Jane Edwardes

It’s hard to imagine that Bond’s chilling play will ever be better served.

04/03/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

Here are huge moral and philosophical themes: pity and terror , which Stewart is supremely capable of expressing and Jackson of directing. The problem is that Bond utterly lacks the human depth those themes require ... Still, Stewart is well worth seeing.

24/02/2012

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The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

Bond's tone and range is limited and there's little Stewart can do with this thankless part, although he does movingly convey Shakespeare's distress at the brutality of a society that relishes hangings and bear baitings.

24/02/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

A frustratingly stolid evening because the scenes themselves are strangely inert and lacking in dramatic energy.

28/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

It is also a role that hardly stretches Stewart. His Shakespeare is ill at ease, out of love with his wife and daughter, and curiously passive – a miserable old bore, in fact. An actor of Stewart’s ability could play this one-dimensional role in his sleep and at times appears to be doing just that.

24/02/2012

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