Betrayal

Harold Pinter

Betrayal

As Jerry and Emma reminisce about times gone by, it’s clear they both yearn for the security of the past. After a seven year affair, their final meeting brings to light the destructiveness of their betrayal and how a single moment in time would change the lives of everyone around them forever. 4.0 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Betrayal

Omniscore:

Location Sheffield
Venue Sheffield Crucible
Director Nick Bagnall
Cast Colin Tierney, John Simm, Ruth Gemmell
From May 2012
Until June 2012
Box Office 0114 249 6000
 

As Jerry and Emma reminisce about times gone by, it’s clear they both yearn for the security of the past. After a seven year affair, their final meeting brings to light the destructiveness of their betrayal and how a single moment in time would change the lives of everyone around them forever.

Reviews

The Observer

Clare Brennan

A potentially mundane tale achieves mythic proportions. It takes an exceptional ensemble to exert the control necessary to pull this off. Tierney, Gemmell and Simm are exceptional.

27/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

The stage resembles a circular glass clock face, with detritus trapped under it. This works to a degree — after all, the drama unspools in reverse, starting with the cruel awakenings after an extramarital liaison and ending with the onset of adulterous passion — but often you just want to focus on the players in the love triangle. Ruth Gemmell, John Simm and Colin Tierney are riveting.

27/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Stage

Ben East

The only real shame is that by the end one wonders why Jerry bothered. Ruth Gemmell only fleetingly offers the sense that Emma actually likes either Jerry or their arrangement - the rest of the time she’s cold, distant, annoyed, even. Perhaps this is Gemmell and Bagnall’s reading of her character and the play - that even affairs soon lose their lustre. Pinter’s writing allows for such questions to formulate, and this production, while not perfect, revels in such open-endedness.

24/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Though she gives a decent enough performance, Ruth Gemmell misses the warm allure of Emma. You almost get the sense that the actress disapproves of the character, and as a result there is little of the required eroticism in the trysts with her lover Jerry in their rented Kilburn flat. Nor does she bring enough fear, grief and guilt to the usually devastating scene when her husband Robert reveals that he knows about her affair with his best friend.

22/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Times

Dominic Maxwell

When you see the show today, in this effective revival by Nick Bagnall, you see a play in which every line is a dagger, a time bomb, a pointed stick. But unlike in most of Pinter’s work — glorious though it is — you always know exactly what the game is here, even if the result is up for grabs. Even as it plays with form, even as it gives you a trio of lying and cheating protagonists, it grips and dazzles throughout.

23/05/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

It wouldn't be Pinter without the pauses, but seldom have they been so stretched to breaking point. Some are so extended that they are like intervals: you could order and sink a gin and tonic in them. Sometimes their length pays comic dividends, and Simm plays them with exquisite delicacy. But the overall effect is to make an already brittle play seem stilted.

23/05/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore