Carousel

Rogers & Hammerstein

Carousel

Set on the New England coastline, Carousel is a story of true love, loss and feelings left unspoken. Following the ill-fated love affair between bad boy Billy Bigelow and trusting Julie Jordan, this classic musical is deeply touching and will capture your heart. 4.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Carousel

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Barbican Centre
Director Jo Davies
Cast Michael Todd Simpson, Katherine Manley, Sarah Tynan, Joseph Shovelton
From August 2012
Until September 2012
Box Office 020 7638 8891
 

Set on the New England coastline, Carousel is a story of true love, loss and feelings left unspoken. Following the ill-fated love affair between bad boy Billy Bigelow and trusting Julie Jordan, this classic musical is deeply touching and will capture your heart.

Reviews

The Times

Libby Purves

If there is one classic musical that deserves an opera company — strong voices, full orchestra, swarming chorus, James Holmes on the baton — it is this. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s darkest story has as much spoken dialogue as any theatre musical but is essentially made of songs fully operatic in their close, sensitive following of each character’s emotional pulse: never a note wasted. And Jo Davies’s production for Opera North, garlanded with stars at the Lowry, loses nothing as it passes through its Barbican weeks on the way to Paris.

18/08/2012

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The Daily Express

Julie Carpenter

Davies’s production, which updates the action to the early 1900s, is rightly cautious about being overly sentimental. The sets are almost austere in their simplicity – an understated ring descends to create the carousel, later becoming a heavenly halo – and little attempt is made to soften Billy. The tall, rangy Michael Todd Simpson manages to convey an unpredictability and restlessness in the role while Katherine Manley as Julie bypasses the insipid victim label.

24/08/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

Without entering a plea of diminished responsibility, Davies implies that Billy's violence had specific social origins. Her production also sharpens the show's contrast between two different kinds of marriage in a 1915 New England fishing village. The one between Billy and the mutinous mill-hand, Julie Jordan, is tempestuous, transient and volatile. That between Julie's friend, Carrie, and the deeply bourgeois Enoch Snow is settled and fertile but, as shown by their secret visits to Broadway burlesque shows, based on a certain sexual hypocrisy.

21/08/2012

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The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

It would be to everyone’s benefit if we could be made to care a little more about the doomed romance at the show’s centre.

21/08/2012

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