Life for Beginners

Ben Ellis, Matt Hartley, Lizzie Nunnery, Rex Obano Alice Birch

Life for Beginners

Tony meets himself but younger. Emma and Sam meet but can never touch. Eva meets Quinn before either goes too far. Nina’s not sure she should ever have met James. And Mark tries to stop Hayley making a tit of herself on national TV. In a play that spans all ages we explore the magical and joyful moments in our everyday lives. 3.4 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Life for Beginners

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Theatre 503
Director Paul Robinson Tim Roseman
Cast Zara Tempest-Walters, Edward Hancock, Alex Beckett, Peter Bramhill, Jacqueline King, Katie McGuinness, Kate Sissons, Mark Wingett Caroline Faber
From September 2012
Until September 2012
Box Office 020 7978 7040
 

Tony meets himself but younger. Emma and Sam meet but can never touch. Eva meets Quinn before either goes too far. Nina’s not sure she should ever have met James. And Mark tries to stop Hayley making a tit of herself on national TV. In a play that spans all ages we explore the magical and joyful moments in our everyday lives.

Reviews

The Stage

Sally Stott

The key scene is a fascinating class in which the history of the American spiritual is addressed. Bobby articulates the idea that traditional black spirituals were clandestine instructions designed to help slaves escape during the 19th century. These songs held coded messages, designed to give details of the best way to avoid recapture if you were a runaway slave. This idea is questioned by Pharus, who argues that runaways had no need for coded instructions and that the function of any song is more directly to inspire though its own inherent musical beauty, and the grace of its words. In other words, Bobby’s view is an invented tradition and has no basis in fact.

07/09/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Daisy Bowie-Sell

Life for Beginners is a meditation on fresh starts, giant leaps, sacrifices and the courage to move on. Each of the five playwrights have created a short play. These were then interwoven, so the scenes chop and change between narratives.

10/09/2012

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The Times

Sam Marlowe

At first, it seems as if its separate narrative threads ... will never properly or persuasively intertwine, and there’s a danger of glibness. But gradually, the tension grows, the five sets of groping fingers flex, and become a single fist; and if the blow they deliver isn’t quite a knock-out, it’s a nimble upper-cut with real emotional impact.

07/09/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

At one point in the evening, a character makes a Freudian slip and blurts out “clitoris” rather than “chrysalis”. It’s a pointed, meaningful error in a show where magical transformations are eventually brought about by a benign plague of butterflies, released in revenge from a lab in Lizzie Nunnery’s segment about a married Nietzschean scientist in search of a Super Baby without strings from his pregnant assistant. This could have been a fey unifying device; instead, it takes flight.

19/09/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

this collective piece is an unusually optimistic hymn to the possibilities of love and fertility, but it's the acting I'll remember as much as the writing. Kate Sissons is outstanding in Rex Obano's study of a woman testing her partner's fidelity on a grisly reality TV show. Caroline Faber is also impressively vengeful as the pregnant lab worker, and Zara Tempest-Walters and Edward Hancock are quietly touching in Matt Hartley's account of two damaged teenagers meeting on a city farm. But, although the five playlets are ingeniously knitted together and fluently staged, I still pin my faith in the clarity of the solo authorial voice.

07/09/2012

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