Love and Information

Caryl Churchill

Love and Information

Someone sneezes. Someone can’t get a signal. Someone shares a secret. Someone won’t answer the door. Someone put an elephant on the stairs. Someone’s not ready to talk. Someone is her brother’s mother. Someone hates irrational numbers. Someone told the police. Someone got a message from the traffic light. Someone’s never felt like this before. In this fast moving kaleidoscope more than a hundred characters try to make sense of what they know. 3.9 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Love and Information

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Royal Court
Director James Macdonald
Cast Nikki Amuka-Bird, Linda Bassett, Scarlett Brookes, Amanda Drew, Laura Elphinstone, Susan Engel, John Heffernan, Justin Salinger, Amit Shah, Rhashan Stone
From September 2012
Until October 2012
Box Office 020 7565 5000
 

Someone sneezes. Someone can’t get a signal. Someone shares a secret. Someone won’t answer the door. Someone put an elephant on the stairs. Someone’s not ready to talk. Someone is her brother’s mother. Someone hates irrational numbers. Someone told the police. Someone got a message from the traffic light. Someone’s never felt like this before. In this fast moving kaleidoscope more than a hundred characters try to make sense of what they know.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Ian Shuttleworth

There is no palpable authorial position being taken; the evening is illustrative rather than argumentative. However, each section includes a “Depression” scene whose text consists of a single incomplete line; taken together they show beautifully the reality of the condition itself and the various ways in which others react to sufferers. Perhaps Churchill is implying that depression is a natural response to contemporary information overload, but she clearly understands the what and the how of it regardless of the why.

18/09/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

For me, Churchill suggests, with compassionate urgency, that our insatiable appetite for knowledge needs to be informed by our capacity for love.

15/09/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

“Knowledge comes but wisdom stays,” wrote Tennyson. Dramatising a world where we have faster and faster access to more and more data but can lose our grip on the human meaning, Churchill has spiritedly updated that maxim.

17/09/2012

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The Stage

Natasha Tripney

The characters, who are never named and none of whom recur, are played by a cast of sixteen. The overall effect is one of looking through a series of windows and glimpsing pieces of people’s lives which together form a human constellation. Some scenes have the elegance of a haiku, others are altogether more toothsome. There’s a fractal quality to the writing; there are patterns and echoes, thematic ripples.

17/09/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

It’s the dramatic equivalent of going through countless emails, some interesting, some touching, some funny, some alarming, and many downright dull. A bewildering sense of information overload sets in and on my return from the theatre I realised that probably only half a dozen of the many scenes had lodged themselves firmly in my memory. So I read the play and once again a good deal of it still failed to linger in my mind.

17/09/2012

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Time Out

Caroline McGinn

Next to 'Top Girls', 'Love and Information' is a minor work by a major dramatist. The vignettes stand or fall on their punchlines: their tweet-length dialogue gives - and teasingly withholds - information but they struggle to convey love, which needs more time. The best scene, in which a woman tries to memorise a series of lists and is surprised by a long-lost memory of her father, is one of the longest in the play.

17/09/2012

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The Times

Dominic Maxwell

Importantly, Love and Information builds. As the first of the 100-plus characters come and go, and you try to work out what the rules are here, you might suspect that Churchill’s exalted status has allowed her just to stick some ideas direct from notebook to stage. And, sure, not everything sings. Yet the more the themes become apparent, the more it feels like a unified piece. Churchill shows us connecting with facts and ideas more readily than we connect with how things really are — with each other.

16/09/2012

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

Watching it is rather like brainy channel-surfing: the scenes, played out in a glowing white cube, flick rapidly by. So what if bits of it drive you up the wall? This is a mischievous rebuke to our age of broadband information glut, in which love and human connection get pushed to the periphery.

23/09/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Kate Bassett

As it progresses, the piece also touches on big issues, from genetics to free will. Mini-dialogues are fleshed out by the cast with such pin-sharp naturalism that you are able to read a character in a millisecond.

23/09/2012

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

At the heart of the play is the idea that it’s hard to process the data with which we are bombarded. The urge to know about the world — to possess facts about it— seems to have squashed humanity and emotional intelligence. One of the best examples of this is a scene in which a couple are unable to remember any aspect of their wedding day except the details captured on video.

17/09/2012

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