She Stoops to Conquer

Oliver Goldsmith

She Stoops to Conquer

Hardcastle, a man of substance, looks forward to acquainting his daughter with his old pal’s son with a view to marriage. But thanks to playboy Lumpkin, he’s mistaken by his prospective son in-law Marlow for an innkeeper, his daughter for the local barmaid. The good news is, while Marlow can barely speak to a woman of quality he’s a charmer with those of a different stamp. And so, as Hardcastle’s indignation intensifies, Miss Hardcastle’s appreciation for her misguided suitor soars. Misdemeanours multiply, love blossoms, mayhem ensues. 3.9 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
She Stoops to Conquer

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue National Theatre
Director Jamie Lloyd
Cast Harry Hadden-Paton, John Heffernan, Cush Jumbo, Katherine Kelly, Steve Pemberton, Matthew Seadon-Young, Timothy Speyer, Sophie Thompson David Fynn
From January 2012
Until March 2012
Box Office 020 7452 3000
 

Hardcastle, a man of substance, looks forward to acquainting his daughter with his old pal’s son with a view to marriage. But thanks to playboy Lumpkin, he’s mistaken by his prospective son in-law Marlow for an innkeeper, his daughter for the local barmaid. The good news is, while Marlow can barely speak to a woman of quality he’s a charmer with those of a different stamp. And so, as Hardcastle’s indignation intensifies, Miss Hardcastle’s appreciation for her misguided suitor soars. Misdemeanours multiply, love blossoms, mayhem ensues.

NT Live Broadcast March 29th

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

It's joyous stuff.

01/02/2012

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The Daily Express

Julie Carpenter

Is it too much? Yes at times but this is a piece all about put-on manners and affectations.

02/02/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

A play, after all, about pretence, in which the characters spend much of the time talking to the audience in asides and in which people rejoice in names such as Mrs Oddfish and Colonel Wallop. But while Lloyd laces it all with sight gags, chirruping servants and even the occasional wink, the tone is affectionate and the production finds the sincerity in the play.

01/02/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

A collective success which leaves the theatre echoing with the sound of the audience's happiness.

01/02/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

There are sequences where you feel that if the eighteenth century had had its Steven Berkoff and Matthew Bourne, the resulting choreography would have looked a bit like this.

01/02/2012

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The Stage

Mark Shenton

The National has another monster comic hit on its hands.

01/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Fresh, spirited and often blissfully funny.

01/02/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

Think fairytale, operetta: there are fa-la-la singing entr’actes, an instant forest, comedy fog, a tendency for servants to appear in clumps, heads filling doorways. The staging has its own laughs by flaring a fire, hooting an owl or crashing a thunderclap a split second too late to match the line. Lloyd takes delight in sending up the text itself.

01/02/2012

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The Observer

Susannah Clapp

Lloyd's staging, profiting from his experience as a director of musicals, takes the temperature of the age and makes it a series of cartoons set to a jig. His skill is to emphasise the play's class politics by turning the servants into a chorus, a bubbling undercurrent. With faces like those in the William Hogarth picture of his servants, they top and tail the action ... You'd hardly call them revolutionary but they do resemble the subversive below-stairs crew of Beaumarchais' 1784 The Marriage of Figaro.

05/02/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Kate Bassett

Leaves a fair bit to be desired, with some of the cast beginning dull and stiff, including Kelly herself and Steve Pemberton as Hardcastle. Elsewhere, the supporting performances go so over-the-top you might think we were still in panto season.

05/02/2012

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The Daily Mail

(Unknown)

This show has high production values which match Goldsmith’s masterly scheming. What it lacks is the soul which would lift it above tech- nical expertise into something more affecting.

01/02/2012

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