The King's Speech

David Seidler

The King's Speech

When King Edward VIII abdicates for the love of Wallis Simpson, his terrified brother Bertie is thrust into the spotlight and crowned King George VI of England. In a room at 146 Harley Street, Bertie and his wife Elizabeth, are meeting the maverick Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue. Breaking all royal protocol the King and his oddball therapist embark together on an unconventional journey to correct the King’s debilitating stammer and help him deliver the radio address that will inspire his country on the brink of World War II. 3.9 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
The King's Speech

Omniscore:

Location Rest of UK
Venue Touring UK
Director Adrian Noble
Cast Jonathan Hyde, Emma Fielding, Ian McNeice, Michael Feast, Charlotte Randle Charles Edwards
From February 2012
Until March 2012
Box Office .
 

When King Edward VIII abdicates for the love of Wallis Simpson, his terrified brother Bertie is thrust into the spotlight and crowned King George VI of England. In a room at 146 Harley Street, Bertie and his wife Elizabeth, are meeting the maverick Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue. Breaking all royal protocol the King and his oddball therapist embark together on an unconventional journey to correct the King’s debilitating stammer and help him deliver the radio address that will inspire his country on the brink of World War II.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

While it's easy to quibble about whether a stage version of The King's Speech is necessary, the results are satisfying ... A West End run looks inevitable.

13/02/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

It is a cracking good story and Seidler deserves credit for seeing its dramatic potential. And, even if the result often seems like a screenplay, the stage version allows Seidler more room to explore the story's political background. We are made more aware of the threat posed in 1936 by the Duke of York's brother, Edward VIII ... The play reminds us, far more explicitly than the film, that he admired Hitler on the grounds there were "no Jews or communists in Germany".

10/02/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

In the theatre, it becomes all the clearer, too, that the story is like an inverted version of Pygmalion, but where Eliza Doolittle needed to be smartened up, the inhibited Bertie needs loosening up and this requires digging into his traumatised childhood.

11/02/2012

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The Observer

Susannah Clap

Charles Edwards could not be bettered as George VI; he is withheld, restrained, so that each of his difficulties seems reluctantly shared with the audience. At times his stammer is no more than a pulse beating in his cheek ... There is an extra agony in seeing this on stage where, with no retakes, stammerers cannot be countenanced.

19/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

What makes the piece so moving in our own debased times is its celebration of the unfashionable virtues of duty and moral decency, qualities that George VI exemplified and so successfully passed on to our own Queen. This production of The King’s Speech is well timed for her Diamond Jubilee year.

13/02/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

This world premiere feels subtler, more thoughtful than the movie. We see more of Logue’s own weaknesses: he was in Britain failing to build a stage career, keeping his homesick wife Myrtle from her longing for Perth. During the Abdication speech the words “without the woman I love by my side” coincide with a simple, effective revolve showing us the Logues at home, silently realising that if Bertie does ask him back after their quarrel, poor Myrtle won’t get home.

14/02/2012

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The Stage

Mark Shenton

An efficient comfort-blanket of a play that, like the endless jukebox musicals that populate the West End, gives you what you already know you will enjoy.

13/02/2012

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