The Sex Myth: Why Everything We're Told is Wrong

Brooke Magnanti

The Sex Myth: Why Everything We're Told is Wrong

Is there any truth to the epidemic of sex addiction? Are our children really getting sexualised younger? Are men the only ones who like porn? Brooke Magnanti looks at all these questions and more - and proves that perhaps we've all been taking the answers for granted. Brooke Magnanti (aka Belle de Jour) is no stranger to controversy. Now her real identity is out in the open, Brooke's background as a scientist and a researcher come to bear in her investigation into the truth behind the headlines, scandals and moral outrage that fill the media (and our minds) when it comes to sex. 3.3 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Sex Myth: Why Everything We're Told is Wrong

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy, Sex & Sexuality
Format Paperback
Pages 272
RRP
Date of Publication May 2012
ISBN 978-0297866398
Publisher Weidenfeld & Nicolson
 

Is there any truth to the epidemic of sex addiction? Are our children really getting sexualised younger? Are men the only ones who like porn? Brooke Magnanti looks at all these questions and more - and proves that perhaps we've all been taking the answers for granted. Brooke Magnanti (aka Belle de Jour) is no stranger to controversy. Now her real identity is out in the open, Brooke's background as a scientist and a researcher come to bear in her investigation into the truth behind the headlines, scandals and moral outrage that fill the media (and our minds) when it comes to sex.

Read an extract from the book | Telegraph

Reviews

The Observer

Catherine Hakim

… as entertaining as it is erudite. Magnanti exposes the weak, even non-existent, evidence base for periodic moral panics surrounding sex. She dissects the factoid evidence on the new "disease" of sex addiction, the sexualisation of children, the way pornography humiliates women, the dangers of porn on the internet, the evils of prostitution and trafficking. Her book should be required reading for all newspaper readers, and for anyone interested in understanding how advocacy research (popular with some academics as well as governments) manufactures findings that are selective, tendentious, dishonest, even incompetent.

15/04/2012

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The Times

Suzi Godson

[An] important book … The Sex Myth is Bad Science for the sex industry, though it lacks the arrogance and wit of Goldacre’s diatribe. Magnanti’s research is, however, just as thorough and although much of it, such as the work on trafficking, has been published before, it has not been widely read — so I hope this book will be.

16/04/2012

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The Evening Standard

Katie Law

Astonishingly thorough … “It is not acceptable to accuse a woman of being inauthentic simply because her choices differ from the ones you might make,” she writes. It’s a good point. Indeed, there is a lot to admire in The Sex Myth, and while it probably won’t sell anything like as well as Belle de Jour’s diaries, it’s a much better book and should be read by anyone claiming an interest in sex and, especially, sex equality.

19/04/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Abby O'Reilly

At no point does reading Magnanti become laborious, owing to her clear, accessible language, insightful humour and wit ... The Sex Myth is an ambitious, meticulously researched and passionate antidote to the damage caused by years of misinformation and the destructive intolerance of those who refuse to consider divergent viewpoints. It is an enlightening must-read for anyone exposed to the press.

22/04/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Melanie McGrath

It’s hard to know what Magnanti thought she was trying to achieve with this book. It might be provocative if it were more intellectually coherent, it might have carried the reader had its tone not been so self-regarding or — in places — so insufferably boring, its sabre rattling might have been more effective if its conclusion had been more original than commonplace.

24/04/2012

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The Sunday Times

Eleanor Mills

I can’t remember a more incoherent, confusing and downright bonkers book … Had Magnanti chosen to write about how a beautiful, middle-class girl with a doctorate in sciences ended up selling her body for cash, she could have had much to tell us. Unfortunately, rather than attempting to analyse her own life choices as a window into the bizarre whys and wherefores of the sex industry, she has written a dreary, often unreadable survey of other people’s research into the trade. It seems inconceivable that a book by a former escort all about sex could be so boring: but, believe me, this one is a crusher.

22/04/2012

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